Download Berlitz Croatia Pocket Guide, Croatia Travel Guide PDF

TitleBerlitz Croatia Pocket Guide, Croatia Travel Guide
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size14.8 MB
Total Pages244
Table of Contents
                            Croatia’s Top 10 Attractions
	Top Attraction #1
	Top Attraction #2
	Top Attraction #3
	Top Attraction #4
	Top Attraction #5
	Top Attraction #6
	Top Attraction #7
	Top Attraction #8
	Top Attraction #9
	Top Attraction #10
A Perfect Tour of Croatia
Introduction
	A Natural Playground
	Cities and Towns
	A Split Personality
	The Legacy of the War
	Croatia Today
A Brief History
	From Prehistory
	Greeks, Romans and Byzantines
	Croatia’s Kings
	Coveted by Hungary and Venice
	The Fall of the Divine Republic
	World Wars I and II
	Croatia under Tito
	Ethnic Rivalries and the Descent to War
	The Homeland War
	Modern Croatia
	Historic Landmarks
Where To Go
	Zagreb
		Donji Grad
		Trg bana Josipa Jelačića
		Kaptol
		Gornji Grad
		Novi Zagreb
		Parks and Gardens
	Inland Croatia
		North of Zagreb
		Plitvice Lakes
		Slavonia
	Istria
		Pula
		Vodnjan
		Rovinj
		Poreč
		Other Coastal Resorts
		Boat Trips from the Coastal Resorts
		Istrian Interior
	Kvarner Gulf
		Rijeka
		The Opatija Riviera
		Paklenica National Park
		Kvarner Gulf Islands
	Dalmatia
		Northern Dalmatia
		Southern Dalmatia: Split
		South of Split
		Dubrovnik
		Dalmatian Islands
What To Do
	Sports
		Diving
		Sailing
		Other Watersports
		Football
		Tennis
		Walking, Hiking and Climbing
	Shopping
		Best Buys
			Food and Drink
			Jewellery and Clothes
			Arts and Crafts
		Where to Shop
	Entertainment
		Cultural Performances
	Croatia for Children
	Calendar of Events
Eating Out
	When to Eat
	What to Eat
		Starters
		Fish and Seafood
		Meat
		Desserts
		Croatian Wine
		Other Drinks
Reading the Menu
	To Help You Order
	Menu Reader
Restaurants
	Central and Eastern Croatia
		Zagreb
		Osijek
		Varaždin
	Istria
		Poreč
		Pula
		Rovinj
	The Kvarner Gulf
		Opatija
		The Islands
	Dalmatia
		Dubrovnik
		Mali Ston
		Makarska
		Šibenik
		Split
		The Islands
		Trogir
		Zadar
A–Z Travel Tips
	A
		Accommodation
		Airports
	B
		Bicycle Rental
		Budgeting for Your Trip
	C
		Camping
		Car Hire
		Climate
		Crime and Safety
	D
		Driving
	E
		Electricity
		Embassies and Consulates
		Emergencies
	G
		Gay and Lesbian Travellers
		Getting There
		Guides and Tours
	H
		Health and Medical Care
	L
		Language
	M
		Money
	O
		Opening Times
	P
		Police
		Post Offices
		Public Holidays
	T
		Telephones
		Time Zones
		Tipping
		Toilets
		Tourist Information
		Transport
	V
		Visas and Entry Requirements
	W
		Websites and Internet Access
	Y
		Youth Hostels
Recommended Hotels
	Central and Eastern Croatia
		Zagreb
		Osijek
		Plitvice Lakes National Park
	Istria
		Motovun
		Novigrad
		Poreč
		Pula
		Rovinj
	Kvarner Gulf
		Opatija
		Paklenica National park
		Rijeka
		The Islands
	Dalmatia
		Dubrovnik
		Makarska
		Mali Ston
		Šibenik
		Split
		Omiš
		The Islands
		Trogir
		Zadar
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 122

Northern Dalmatia

During the Homeland War, Zadar ) [map] was cut off from the rest of the
country as Serb forces pummelled the historic centre. Today the city is firmly
back on its feet, with museums of interest, a revamped waterfront, hotels and
lively nightlife.

Zadar’s old town is spectacularly situated on a peninsula, its sturdy walls and
lofty gates protecting it from attack. Široka Ulica , the arrow-straight Roman
road that dissects the old town, passes many of the key sights as it makes its way
west to the Adriatic. The post-World War II buildings that replaced those
destroyed by Allied bombs are all too evident, but amid them is the Baroque
church of St Simeon . Its treasure is the Romanesque sarcophagus by the
Milanese goldsmith Francesco di Antonio da Sesto, embellished with reliefs
depicting the life of the saint and the rescue of his relics from the Venetians by
Louis I.

Further west is Narodni Trg , the square that took over from the Roman Forum
as the hub of city life during the Middle Ages. Fronting the square is a Venetian-
era Town Loggia (loža; Mon–Sat 8am–8pm, Sun 9am–1pm; free), housing an art
gallery and temporary exhibitions. Also on the square is the 16th-century Guard
House with its lofty clock tower, as well as a couple of pavement cafés. From
Narodni Trg you can head north through the old Sea Gate and across a
footbridge to the newer part of the city.

Page 123

St Donat’s Church

Dominic Burdon/Apa Publications

A 10-minute walk west along Široka Ulica from Narodni Trg brings you to the
site of the Roman Forum. Here, among the stony remains of what was once
Zadar’s focal point, stands the city’s symbol, St Donat’s Church (opening hours
vary). The cylindrical church was built in the 9th century using, in part, stones
culled from the Roman Forum, which can be recognised by their Latin
inscriptions. The compact two-storey interior, with its tightly packed stone walls,

Page 243

http://www.hotelslavija.hr
http://www.vestibulpalace.com
http://www.hotel-villadvor.hr
http://www.kastil.hr
http://www.lesic-dimitri.com
http://www.martinis-marchi.com
http://www.podstine.com

Page 244

http://www.hotelsangiorgiovis.com
http://www.concordia-hotel.net
http://www.hotel-palace.net
http://www.arthotel-kalelarga.com
http://www.hotel-bastion.hr

Similer Documents