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Page 1

BABBITT’S PRINCIPLES OF LIGHT AND COLOR.—PLATE I.


VARIOUS SHADES OF GRAY ARRANGED IN ANALOGICAL HARMONY.


SPECTRA OF THE SUN, SIRIUS, AND SEVERAL ELEMENTS.

BABBITT’S PRINCIPLES OF LIGHT AND COLOR.—PLATE II.


CHROMATIC HARMONY OF GRADATION AND CONTRAST.




CONTRASTING CHROMATIC COLORS PLACED OPPOSITE THOSE WHICH ANALOGICAL
HARMONY FORM A CHEMICAL AFFINITY WITH THEM HARMONY


In the above elaborate combination of colors the artist has found it impossible to get every feature accurate
although he has many beautiful and pure tints. The grays on both plates I. and II. are not sufficiently
dued, the chromatic colors standing out too brilliantly, the red, for instance, in the house, fig. 6, being
strong, etc. For description of plates see pp. 63, 65, 66, 69, 71, etc. The spectra are described on p. 217.

Page 2

THE

PRINCIPLES
OF

LIGHT AND COLOR:


INCLUDING AMONG OTHER THINGS


THE HARMONIC LAWS OF THE UNIVERSE, THE
ETHERIO-ATOMIC PHILOSOPHY OF FORCE,

CHROMO CHEMISTRY, CHROMO THERA-
PEUTICS, AND THE GENERAL PHIL-

SOPHY OF THE FINE FORCES,
TOGETHER WITH NUMER-

OUS DISCOVERIES AND
PRACTICAL APPLI-

CATIONS.





ILLUSTRATED BY 204 EXQUISITE PHOTO-ENGRAVINGS, BESIDES FOUR
SUPERB COLORED PLATES PRINTED ON SEVEN PLATES EACH.



BY EDWIN D. BABBITT.


"Study the Light; attempt the high; seek out
The Soul's bright path."—Bailey.



NEW YORK:
BABBITT & CO.,

SCIENCE HALL, 141 EIGHTH STREET.
1878.

PREFACE.


———


THE preface of my work is like a Hebrew book; it begins at its
very end. Having spent several years in developing this large vol-
ume, what is my excuse for thrusting it out upon mankind? None at
all unless human knowledge and upbuilding can be enhanced thereby.

Am I laboring under a vain delusion when I assert that no science
whatever, excepting pure mathematics, has thus far reached down to
basic principles—that in spite of the wonderful achievements of exper-
imental scientists, no definite conceptions of atomic machinery, or the
fundamental processes of thermal, electric, chemical, physiological or
psychological action have been attained, and that because the correla-
tions of matter and force have been misapprehended? If I am de-
luded and cannot depend upon the thousand facts that seem to sus-
tain me and clear up so many mysteries, it is certainly a sad matter,
for then no one will be made the wiser for my labors; if I am right,
and so many scientists are wrong in their conceptions of force, then
too there is a melancholy side to the question, for great will be the
trouble of having to pull up old stakes and put down new ones, and
some opinionated persons will be so indignant at having dear old be-
liefs attacked, that if unable to demolish my facts in fair discussion
will present one-sided views of them, or attack the author himself. I
hope and pray that I may be duly abused, however, by all such crys-
tallized conservatives, otherwise it will show that my efforts to advance
this great cause of truth have been but feeble. After all, if this work
shall develop some new and better foundations of scientific truth, sci-
entific men themselves should rejoice at it even if it does cause a little
trouble to adjust themselves to new conditions, for the more truth they
get, the more luminous and triumphant will their pathway of progress
become, and they will be able to build a superstructure upon these
new foundations that is far more magnificent than any which my own
limited efforts could achieve.

My discovery of the form and constitution of atoms, and their
working in connection with etherial forces to produce the effects of
heat, cold, electricity, magnetism, chemical action, light, color, and
many other effects, was announced during our centennial year, 1876,
in some New York and Chicago papers, and my ideas have been
brought to still further maturity since. Having acquired this knowl-
edge, it seemed quite possible at last to crystallize the subjects of

Page 143

276 CHROMO-CHEMISTRY.


sence of intense sunlight." It would doubtless be a better
explanation to say that the animals are made white there by the
intense cold and electricity, as we have already seen in this
chapter, X, the tendency of cold to whiteness of effect, as in
snow, frozen carbonic acid, pale countenances, etc.

2. The sun causes its yellow and brown effect from driving
the molecules of carbon into the skin, thus tanning and toughen-
ing the cuticle. The cold of the far north prevents the people
from becoming as dark as they are in the torrid zones. Dr.
Winslow says:—"Intemperate persons, addicted to vinous pota-
tions, have a sallow and olive-hued complexion. The dark and
dingy color of the pigmy people who live in high northern
latitudes, arises principally from the fish and oils of a rancid and
often offensive character, upon which they mainly subsist. This
kind of diet is believed not only to affect the color of the skin,
but to cause a diminution of the stature of this race, in cones-
quence of their blood being difficult of assimilation and defective
in nutrition."

3. So far as intemperance darkens the skin, the inhabitants of
the temperate zones drink more than they do in the frigid, and
have more miasma, also, to make them bilious and yellow, and
more than that, when they eat pork and fat, especially in warm
weather, they have not the amount of keen, electrical oxygen to
help them digest this carbon, in the shape of fatty foods, that
their northern neighbors have. The carbon, belonging as it does
to the thermal substances, needs an affinitive principle of elec-
tricity for its proper digestion, for which reason it is more safe
to eat it in winter than in summer, and in cold than in warm
climates.


XXVI. SUMMATION OF POINTS IN CHROMO CHEMISTRY.

1. Spectrum Analysis, which has proved incomparably more exact than

any other method of ascertaining the chemical properties of bodies, is

founded on the fact that any element, when heated until it becomes incan-

descent or is converted into luminous vapor, manifests its character in the

grade of color which it radiates.

2. Instead of there being seven colors in the solar spectrum, there are
many thousands of shades and tints of color. Sir David Brewsier


SUMMATION OF POINTS IN CHROMO-CHEMISTRY. 277

counted 2000 Fraunhöfer lines, each of which signifies some distinct grade

of color, while there is also a large space in the spectrum where no Fraun-

höfer lines are visible, over which infinite grades of hues are scattered.

3. The culminating point of heat in the spectrum is near the thermal;
of light, in the yellow; of electricity, in the blue and indigo, although the

finest electricity is in the violet. Stokes found the strongest electricities, as

signified by means of hydrochloric acid, in the violet indigo. Other sub-

stances place it elsewhere, from their especial kinds of chemical affinity.
4. Spectrum Analysis, although rich in facts, has not hitherto been

crystallized into a science.
5. The colors which any substance exhibits in its spectrum, show its

repellent or reflective potencies when under chemical combination.
6. The ordinary appearance of an element when isolated or cold, shows

what color it is repellant of; but when heated or in chemical combination

this repulsion greatly changes, becoming more violent, and generally assum-

ing different colors.
7. The chemical affinities of a substance may be determined by its re-

pulsions according to the atomic law already explained, Chap. Third,

XXXVII, 10.
8. Elements which in their cold, isolated character are white, are more

electrical in their ordinary condition, but have a predominance of thermism

when chemically combined, as in the case of the Alkalies and other white

metals.
9. Black or dark Elements, though in a thermal condition when un-

combined, sometimes have a thermal predominance, sometimes an electrical

one in the spectrum, or in chemical combination, according to whether

their original grade of black was at the thermal or electrical end of the

spectrum, or both, but on the whole have the warm principle more espe-

cially.
10. Gray and also transparent elements generally have both the ther-

mal and electrical elements largely developed in their spectrum.

11. No elements have positive electrical colors in their normal state, but
several have positive thermal colors. These under heat or chemical com-

bination tend to assume higher grades of fineness, becoming highly electrical

when active.
12. The most powerful substances are transparent.

Page 144

278 CHROMO-CHEMISTRY.


13. Transparent Fluids, though abounding in both thermal and elec-
trical patencies, have more frequently a preponderance of electricity.

14. Transparent solids, from their thorough polarization, are on the
whole unequaled in hardness.

15. All substances under free chemical action, tend to repel and stimu-
late those having the same grade of color with themselves. Among
many applications of this rule we may note how in therapeutics
the red-colored substances stimulate the arterial blood, yellow
and orange ones the nervous system, including cerebral stimu-
lants, emetics, purgatives, diuretics, etc,

16. All substances under full chemical action tend to attract, or
combine in harmonious union, those substances whose colors have a

chemical affinity with their own. This rule accounts for the
blue of the sky and ocean, the green of the leaves, the laws of
germination, vision, chemical action in therapeutics, the har-
monic contrast of colors in nature, the healing power of sun-
light, photographic action, Homeopathic triturations, and many
other things.

17. Not only can it be shown that sunlight is an actual sub-
stance capable of being collected, measured and controlled, but the

very materials of which each color is composed can be given, and

the law of its movement explained. This is not denying that the
undulatory theory of light has important features of truth in it.

18. The law of Metachromism shows why it is that in binary
and some other compounds, the increase of oxygen and other blue-

forming elements, develops the red end of the spectrum, while the

increase of potassium, hydrogen, and other red or yellow-forming

elements, tends to increase the affinitive blue or violet.

19. Facts made known by the spectroscope, analogies and the
experience of those persons who have a more interior vision de-

veloped, show the existence of more refined and beautiful octaves

of color beyond those which appeal to the ordinary vision. They

show also that the ordinary vision cannot take in quite one com-

plete scale of colors, the heat color below the red in the spectrum,

which is termed thermal, being invisible.

20. Different colors have relations to taste, such as sweet, sour,
alkaline, saline, burning, etc.

21. The complexion of people in different zones of the earth is
modified by the sunlight.

CHROMO THERAPEUTICS, OR CHROMOPATHY. 279






CHAPTER SIXTH.


CHROMO-THERAPEUTICS, OR CHRO-
MOPATHY.


I. THE HEALING POWER OF COLOR.


This must be quite evident to the reader by this time,

especially as, in the last chapter, we saw the wonderful power of
color repulsions and color affinities, and saw also that all things
manifest their potencies by means of color. This being true,
then, we may construct a more exquisite and exact Materia
Medica, and erect a standard of medical practice based on prin-
ciples of almost mathematical precision. Not only may we, by
means of the principles already laid down, judge of the medical
potencies of the coarser mineral elements, but of the finer poten-
cies of the vegetable world, of water, air, electricity, and mag-
netism, and the still finer forces of the sunlight. Sunlight
constitutes a truly celestial materia medica which, according to
principle XV of Chap. First, must be more safe, effective and
enduring than the cruder elements, in case we know how to
control it.


II. COMPARATIVE FINENESS OF HEALING ELEMENTS.

Minerals are at the bottom of nature's scale of forces, being so

crude that the most of their particles are unable to float in
the atmosphere, and consequently are held down in the midst of
earthy substances. The vegetable world which constitutes the
direct food of man, is sifted of the coarser mineral elements by
a beautiful and ingenious process, the carbon and some other of
the finer elements of the sunlight and atmosphere being received
into the plant or vegetable from the sky, while the elements
that come from the earth are strained of their coarser ingre-
dients by the spongioles of the root and absorbed only in a

Page 286

558 INDEX.


grouping of flowers for contrast, 75.
linear arrangement of flowers, 75.
Chevreul's groups of quincunxes, 75.
colors for rapid flower growth, 381.

Fluorescence—its basic law, 138.
FORCE—its all-embracing character, 94.

works according to law, 7, 22.
theories of, 87, 409.
gradations of, 57.
etherio atomic law of, 94 to 165.

FORCES—Terrestrial, 181.
thermo-electric currents, 181.
how they affect the magnetic needle, 183.
odic force. See Chromo Dynamics.
Fraunhofer, 221, 217, 261, 259, 398.


G.


Galileo—his portrait, 14.
GALVANISM—its grades of electricity, 126.

its atomic and chemical action, 139.
some mysteries explained, 140, 141.

Glass, colored for healing, 336-339. GRADATION—
its law given, 16.

gradation of size in trees, spires, etc., 17.
of direction as in curvature, 18.
in undulations and vibrations, 18, 19.
in the human form, 19
as approved by Greeks and Romans, 19.
illustrated by views of faces, 20, 21.
by view of a beautiful landscape, 24
by picture of sky scenery, 25.
by portrait of Queen of Delhi, etc., 27.
by femininity of style, 26.
by the law of perfection, 40, etc.
in architecture, 43, 44, 45, etc.
gradation of light and shade, 21.
of colors, motions, and forces, 22, 65.
in rhetoric, music, and social life, 22.
of instrumentalities and forces, 56.
of the forces in man, 56.
gradation from matter to spirit, 56.
progressive array of forces, diagram, 57.
of colors and forces in the spectrum, 68.

GRAVITATION unites the universe, 8.
has no relation to magnetism, 82.
millions of times swifter than light, 108.
atomic law concerning it, 158.
ethereal force which it uses, 112, 180.

Gregory, F.R.S.E., Prof.. 416, 452, 454 Grove—his
opinion on light, 84.


H.

Hahnemann and homeopathy, 256, 522. Hammond,
Dr. Wm. A., 452.
HARMONY, its great central law, 12.

illustrated by several cuts, 12.
its application to forms and colors, 12.
seen in chiaroscuro, 13, 14, 15.
illustrated by etching from Rubens, 15.
by picture from London Art Journal, 14.
by sketches from Gustave Doré, etc., 14.
by tomb of Plautus Lucanus, etc., 15.
by the blending of extremes, 15, 16.

Healing—see Chromo Therapeutics.
HEAT causes its sting by lashing, 120.

the law of motion for heat, 120.
coarse and fine grades of heat, 120.
coarse heat painful, fine heat soft, 121.
chemical action of heat and cold, 121.
why heat destroys cohesion, 123.
specific heat of different substances, 156.

latent and sensible heat, 157.
heat of various combustibles, 214.
For finer grades of heat, see Chromo-Dynam-
ics, etc., under odic force.

Heliochromes, or colored sun pictures, 240.
Helmholtz, referred to, 160.

quoted from, 177, 511, 539, 544, 546.
Henry, Prof., on electricity, 155.
Herschel, Sir John, 245. 271.
Herschel, Sir Wm., on the sun, 188.

referred to, 203.
Holyrood Abbey—Arches from, 33.
HOMEOPATHY—its chemical law, 256.

trituration deals with contrasts, 256-259.
Houdin, the conjuror, 458.
Huggins analysis of nebulæ, 170.

referred to 187.
Hume's materialism, 96.
Hunt, Prof. Robert—theory of light, 83.

opinion of undulatory theory, 84.
quoted from, 128, 239, 243, 247, 249. 250, 271,

272, 379. 380. 381.
Huxley, referred to, 91, 538.
Hydrogen, 147, 204, 214, 217, 225, 234, 244. 246,

250, 263, etc.


I.

INDUCTION AND DEDUCTION, 80.

both methods should be adopted, 80.
Insect Life destroyed by blue, 388.

increased by yellow most, red next. 387


J.

Jencken on undulatory theory, 84.


K.

Kant—his vague idealism, 90, 518.
Kerosene or Coal oil, 207.
Kirchhoff, referred to, 188, 185, 227.


L.

La Place on velocity of gravitation, 108.

on the source of the planets, 170.
opinions given, 178.

Lewis, Prof. Taylor, on nature, 2, 57.
Liebig, 297, 389.
LIGHT, its importance, etc., 1.

undulatory theory a half truth, 83.
many things unexplained by it, 84.
how it is produced, 193.
Spottiswoode, Tyndall, Lommel, 193.
luminelles necessary to light, 195.
refraction, reflection, absorption, polarization,
etc., see Chromo Philosophy.
see also Colors, Chromo Chemistry, etc.
light used to typify the Infinite, 532.

Locke—his error concerning heat, 90.
Lockyer, referred to, 186, 187, 188, etc.
Lommel, referred to, 91, 194, 394.
London Art Journal, illustrations copied from,

14, 20, 37, etc.


M.

MAGNETISM, or modified electricity, 129.

how its curves are formed 116, 129.
its longitudinal lines of force, 129.
why the needle points northward, 130.
why similar electricities repel, etc., 130.



INDEX 559

MAGNETISM, continued.

why steel makes a permanent magnet, 131.
why rubbed glass attracts, 131.
why a magnet attracts, 131.
why heat destroys magnetism. 132.
why the north pole is the stronger, 130.
magnetism and diamagnetism, 133.
made clear by atomic laws, 135.
terrestrial magnetism explained, 182.
dip of the needle explained, 183.
magnetic poles of earth explained, 181.
psycho magnetism with cut, 481.

Mascart, 227, 270.
MATTER, its refining processes, 172.

oxygen, ozone, antozone, 172.
how diamond and plumbago differ, 173 .
a refined grade of all elements, 173.
refined particles float the highest, 174.
vegetable and mineral elements, 174

Medical men. 371, 519.
Mellom, 242.
Milky Way, number of stars, 9.

Wm. Herschel's conception of, 203.
Mazarine blue glass—its defects, 337.
Mirabeau—quoted from, 29.
MOON, statistics of, 199.

a fragmentary and dead world, 199.
eclipses and phases of the moon, 201.


N.


NATURE, our guide, 1.

its laws those of perfection, 2.
its unimpeded growths beautiful, 36.
as in plants, crystals, human forms, 37.
they exemplify moral perfection, 38.
grand teachings of the solar system, 38.
teachings of a good and bad leaf cluster. 39.
divine lessons from a leaf, 39.
nature's lessons of sacrifice, 57.
nature works by definite laws, 7, 78.
its unity of law, 3-11, 523.

Nebulous matter—its character, 167.
Nebulous theory proved true, 166.
Newton, Isaac,—theory of light, 58.

referred to, 178, 204, 412, 548.
Nitrogen, 234, 235, etc.


O.

Odic Light—see Chromo Dynamics.
Orange, 102, 290, 290, 294, etc.
Oxygen, 148, 149, 204, 234, 244, 261, 246, 263,

267, etc.
blue but rubific, 245, 250, 269.

Oxyhydrogen blow-pipe, 208.
Ozone and Antozone, 172.


P.

Pancoast, Dr., quoted from, 282, 283, 284, 285.
PERFECTION—its great general law, 40.

as exemplified in Niagara Falls, 40.
in the human head, 41.
in a beautiful human form, 41.
in general forms, motions, etc., 42.
in landscape, 42.
in light, shade and color, 43.
in the Aurora Borealis, 43.
in architecture, including views and descrip-
tions of Greek, Gothic, Chinese and Oriental
styles, with domes, towers, buildings, win-
dows, roofs, etc., 43-49.

Phosphorescence, how caused, 135.
phosphorus, fireflies, plants, etc., 136.

PHOTOGRAPHY, its chemistry given, 255.
Planet forming process, 169.
Pleasanton, Gen., referred to, 128, 191.

quoted from, 382, 383,384-386, 387, 388.
Polarized Light. See Chromo Philosophy.
Potassium, 147, 217, 228, etc.

red potency but develops blue, 245.
Proctor, Prof., on the end of the earth, etc., 177

referred to, 190.
Pynchon, Prof., quoted from, 211, 390.


R.

Red—see Chromo Therapeutics, etc.

for its atomic principle see 101, 102, etc.
Reflection, 397. (Chromo Philosophy.)
Refraction, 394. See Chromo Philosophy.
REFINEMENT OF MATERIAL—its law,

54.
power of refined elements of water, 54.
refinement and power of gravitation, 55.
refinement of the exquisite soul forces, 55.
of the higher grades of heat, 55.
all positive power is invisible, 56.

Reichenbach, Baron, referred to, 154, 417.
quoted from, 416 onward, 488.

Repulsion.—See Chromo Chemistry.
Roscoe, Prof., quoted from, 185, 220, 223, 270,

271.
Rubens, an etching from, 13.
Rumford, Count, and Dynamic theory, 152.

referred to, 245.
Ruskin, an expounder of nature. 2.

quoted from, 5, 33, 51, 53.


S.

Schelling and Hegel, 90, 518.
SCIENTISTS—their great achievements, 80.

have failed in basic principles, 80.
do not grasp the "soul of things," 81.
cannot account for cohesion, 81.
or chemical affinity, 81.
or electricity and its phases, 82.
or gravitation, 82.
or explain physical and mental law, 83.
or the philosophy of light, 83
or how colors are formulated, 84.
or chromatic phenomena, 85.
or chromo-chemistry, 86.
or chromo-therapeutics, 86.
or the form and working of atoms, 87.
or grasp the duality of force, 87.
swinging to the extreme of the dynamic the-

ory or to that of the material theory, 88.
the knowledge of atoms needed, 91.
they dwell too much with the gross, 451.
hence fail in exact knowledge, 451.

Secchi, 411.
SHADOW, an actual substance, 198.

its importance in chiaroscuro, 13.
Sherwood, H. H., M.D., his important experi-

ments, 472, 494, 496-500.
5moke, how produced and managed, 206.
Sodium, 147, 228, 264 223, etc.
SPECTRUM ANALYSIS described, 216.

spectra of gases and solids, 217.
amazing accuracy of analysis, 218.
the spectroscope described, 218.
metals discovered by spectroscope, 219.
spectrum analyzed, 67, 220, 395, etc.
most electrical part of spectrum, 221.
color analysis may become a science, 222.
error of scientists, 223, 224.
color potencies may be understood, 224.

Page 287

560 INDEX.

SPECTRUM ANALYSIS, continued.

meaning of spectrum of an element, 224.
spectra of white elements given, 227.
spectra of alkaline metals, 228.
spectra of other white metals, 229.
spectra of black or dark elements, 230.
spectra of gray or neutral elements, 231.
of elements with chromatic colors, 232.
spectra of transparent elements, 234.

Spencer, Herbert—his unknowable, 523.
Star clusters and nebulæ, 9, 10.
Statuvolence, 465.
Struve's estimate of sun's motion, 190.
SUN—its process of formation, 168.

centre of unity for its system, 8.
solar statistics, 190.
solar atmosphere, photosphere, etc., 185.
chromosphere, coronas, etc., 186.
elements in the sun, 187.
spots and faculæ on the sun, 188.
comparative sizes of sun and planets, 189
sun power and General Pleasanton, 190.
Tyndall’s eulogy of the sun incorrect, 191.


T.


Taylor, Bayard, quoted from, 503.
Trans-red and trans-violet, 138.
TRUTH, rules through all nature, 53.

light the greatest truth-teller, 53.
Ruskin concerning a "whole truth," 53.
Bulwer's remark about plain truth, 54.
why man is not yet truthful, 54.

Tyndall, 7, 90, 87,152, 193, 194.
quoted from, 131, 158, 185, 191, 400, 403, 404,

415,451.


U.

UNDULATORY THEORY, 409, 84, 85.

See Chromo Philosophy.
UNITY, exemplifies oneness, etc., 3.

Seen in snow crystals and microzoa, 3.
in leaves, flowers, shells, etc., 4.
in tree-forms, grasses, etc., 5,
in the nervous and vascular system, 6.
in crystallizations, 6, 3.
in vibrations, undulations, magnetism, 7.
in light, color, gravitation, cohesion, 8.
in poetry, musical composition, logic, 7.
in the solar system and star clusters, 8, 9.
in the whole known universe, 10.
in mental and spiritual realms, 10, 11.
the great law deduced from unity, 11.
illustrated by figs. 1-32.
unity in both matter and mind, 523.


V.


VEGETABLE LIFE—Chromo Culture of,

378.
review of ground already covered, 378.
GERMINATION needs electrical rays, 378.
experiments by Hunt, Lawson, etc., 379.
thermal rays impede germination, 380.
growth above ground requires what, 380.
best colors to make woody fibre, 381.
colors for FLOWERS and SEED, 381.
blue and clear glass for hot-houses, 382.
heat caused by blue and clear glass, 383.

MARVELOUS GROWTH caused, 384.
Gen. Pleasanton's experiments given, 384.
immense crops of fruit produced, 385.
Commodore Goldsboro's experience, 386.
colors for withered plants, 386.
colors that destroy insect life, 387.
light and shadow on plants, 388.
plants that emit light (Linnæus), 389.
Affinities and repulsions of plants, 389.
Color as related to FRAGRANCE, 389.
adaptation of seasons to growth, 390.
summation of points, 391.

Violet—see Chromo Therapeutics.
for its atomic principle, 101, 102, etc.

VISION——ITS GENERAL MACHINERY, 534,
cornea, iris, pupil, lens, etc., 534.
coats, humors, ciliary bones, etc.,, 535.
choroid enlarged, vasa vorticosa, etc., 536.
refractive media, 536.
eyes are never a real black or blue, 537.
adjustment to distance, 537.
optic nerve—its chiasm and source, 537.
the retina considered in detail, 538.
magnified view of fovea centralis, 539.
description by Helmholz, 539.
its amazing structure, 540.
luminous effects of pressure, 541.
the punctum cœcum (blind spot), 541.
rods and cones—their office, 541.
the sensation of sight, 542.
why objects are not seen inverted, 543.
the PERCEPTION of COLORS, 543.
machinery for perceiving tones, 543.
machinery for perceiving colors, 544.
works through chemical affinity, 545.
mysteries explained by atomic law, 545.
misconceptions of optical scientists, 546.
Scherffer, Chevrenl, Helmholtz, etc., 546.
another mystery of vision solved, 547.
color blindness—how caused, 548.
DISEASES of the EYE, 549.
myopia, or near-sightedness, 549.
presbyopia, or long-sightedness, 549.
strabismus or squint, 549.
amaurosis, or nerve paralysis, 550.
cataract, and muscce volitantes, 550.
astigmatism, hemeralopia, etc., 550.
ophthalmia (inflamed coats of the eye), 550.
color of lights for weak eyes, 551.
the crystal light, 551.


W.


Wallace, Alfred Russel, 389, 430.

his answer to Win. B. Carpenter, 458.
Watt's Index of Spectra, 227.
Winslow, Dr. Forbes, 275, 329, 332.
WORLD FORMATIONS—progressive, 166.

how worlds naturally end, 199.
planets and asteroids, 202.


Y.


Yellow—see Chromo Therapeutics, etc., for its

atomic principle, 101, 102, etc.


Z.

Zantedeschi on magnetism, 127.


THE END.
WHOLE NUMBER OF PAGES, 576.

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