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TitleANTECEDENTS AND OUTCOMES OF PERCEIVED CREEPINESS IN ONLINE PERSONALIZED
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.7 MB
Total Pages281
Table of Contents
                            List of Tables
List of Figures
Abstract
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
	Statement of the Problem
	Purpose and Objective of the Research
	Research Model
	Significance of the Studies
CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE REVIEW
	Privacy
	Online Information Privacy Concerns
	Control
	Transparency
	Context
	Other Concepts
CHAPTER 3: RESEARCH DESIGN & METHODS
CHAPTER 4: STUDY RESULTS
	Study 1: What is Creepy? Towards Understanding That Eerie Feeling When it Seems the Internet “Knows” You
		Key Findings & Outcomes
	Study 2: Demystifying Creepy Marketing Communications
		Key Findings & Outcomes
	Study 3: The Effect of Transparency, Control, Control and Trust on Perceived Creepiness of Online Personalized Communications
		Key Findings & Outcomes
CHAPTER 5: DISCUSSION
	Theory Building
		Conceptualize – The Phenomenon of Problem of Practice is Presented
		Operationalize – The Connection between the Concept and Practice Takes Place
		Confirm – The Framework is Applied within the Environment Where the Phenomenon Exists
		Apply – The Theoretical Framework is Either Confirmed or Disconfirmed
		Refine – The Framework is Refined and Developed as New Learnings and Applications are Discovered
	Implications for Scholars
	Implications for Practitioners
CHAPTER 6: LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH
	Limitations
		Sampling Universe
		Narrow Scope of Factors Examined
		Subjectivity
	Future Research
Appendix A: What is “Creepy”? Towards Understanding That Eerie Feeling When it Seems the Internet “Knows” You (Study 1)
Appendix B: Demystifying Creepy Marketing Communications (Study 2)
Appendix C: The Effect of Transparency, Control, and Trust on Perceived Creepiness of Online Personalized Communications (Study 3)
	Manipulation Checks and Results
Appendix D: Development of Perceived Creepiness Scale
REFERENCES
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

ANTECEDENTS AND OUTCOMES OF PERCEIVED CREEPINESS IN
ONLINE PERSONALIZED COMMUNI CATIONS





by




ARLONDA M. STEVENS





Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of


Doctor of Philosophy





Weatherhead School of Management

Designing Sustainable Systems







CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY






May, 2016

Page 2

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES


We hereby approve the thesis/dissertation of

Arlonda M. Stevens


candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.*


Committee Chair

Richard J. Boland, Jr., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University


Committee Member

Mary Culnan, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, Bentley University


Committee Member

Kalle Lyytinen, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University


Committee Member

Casey Newmeyer, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University



Date of Defense

March 2, 2016



*We also certify that written approval has been obtained

for any proprietary material contained therein.

Page 140

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that may not exist within the researchers’ personal and professional network. We

received 338 responses from Mechanical Turk, representing 81% of our sample data.

The online survey host was Qualtrics, which sent 334 emails to the personal and

professional network of the co-investigator, of which 126 were opened, yielding an open

rate of 38%; of those opened, 47% of 59 surveys were completed. Based on a study by

Silverpop, the average open rate for email marketing messages within the US is 20.1%.16

While our email is not a marketing message per se, this measure provides us with insight

as to how our results compare to mainstream email marketing messages. According to

Fluid Surveys University, the average response rate for online surveys to the general

public is 24.8%17 which is in line with (Sheehan & Hoy, 1999b) study on email survey

response rates that reported the response rate to be 24% in 2000. Our survey was in line

with baseline open and response rates for email surveys. Total email responses

represented 14% of our sample data. Lastly, the survey was posted on LinkedIn and

Facebook, which garnered 21 responses, equating to 5% of our sample data.

In total, our survey generated 418 responses. Surveys that were less than 50%

complete were eliminated, resulting in 389 valid responses. Since MTurk completed over

80% of the surveys within seven days, we did not have wave phenomena; therefore, we

did not do a wave analysis to measure wave invariance. Demographic information

including the age, gender, and highest educational level achieved of the respondents is

displayed in Table B3. Most notable is that 55% of the respondents were male and 45%

were female. Median age was 37 years old and 61% had attained a Bachelor’s, Master’s,


16 http://idma.ie/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Email-Marketing-Metrics-Benchmark-Study-2014-
Silverpop.pdf
17 http://fluidsurveys.com/university/response-rate-statistics-online-surveys-aiming

http://idma.ie/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Email-Marketing-Metrics-Benchmark-Study-2014-Silverpop.pdf
http://idma.ie/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Email-Marketing-Metrics-Benchmark-Study-2014-Silverpop.pdf
http://fluidsurveys.com/university/response-rate-statistics-online-surveys-aiming

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Professional or Doctorate degree. Eighty-five percent of the respondents spend 40 hours

or less online excluding email and work related activities, and 73% of the respondents

have been Internet users between eleven and twenty years.

Table B3. Demographics Summary of Our Sample

Item Number Percentage

Gender (N=389)

Male 213 55%

Female 175 45%

Not Reported 1 0%



Age (N=389)

18 - 27 (Millinieals) 72 19%

28 - 43 (Gen X) 195 50%

44 - 62 (Baby Boomer) 110 28%

63+ (Traditionalist) 8 2%

Not Reported 4 1%



Education Level (N=389)

Some high school; No Diploma 3 1%

High School Graduate 91 23%

Associates Degree 58 15%

Bachelor's Degree 148 38%

Master's Degree 73 19%

Professional Degree 7 2%

Doctorate Degree 8 2%

Not Reported 1 0%



Internet Usage (N=389)

0 - 5 Years 6 2%

6 - 10 Years 41 11%

11 -15 Years 126 32%

16 - 20 Years 160 41%

Over 20 Years 53 14%

Not Reported 3 1%

Page 280

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