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TitleAn Introduction to General Systems Thinking
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LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages308
Table of Contents
                            Chapter 1. The Problem
Chapter 2. The Approach
Chapter 3. System and Illusion
Chapter 4. Interpreting Observations
Chapter 5. Breaking Down Observations
Chapter 6. Describing Behavior
Chapter 7. Some Systems Questions
                        
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An Introduction to General Systems Thinking
Gerald M.Weinberg
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PUBLISHED BY:
Weinberg & Weinberg
An Introduction to General Systems Thinking
Copyright © 2011 by Gerald M. Weinberg


Dear Reader: Even with many layers of editing, mistakes can slip through, alas.
But, together, we can eradicate the nasty nuisances. If you encounter typos or
errors in this book, please send them to me at: <[email protected]>
Thank you! - Jerry Weinberg


All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved
above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced
into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written
permission of both the copyright owner and the above publisher of this book.

Contents
Preface to the Silver Anniversary Edition

Original Preface
How to Use This Book

Acknowledgements
Chapter 1. The Problem
Chapter 2. The Approach
Chapter 3. System and Illusion
Chapter 4. Interpreting Observations
Chapter 5. Breaking Down Observations
Chapter 6. Describing Behavior
Chapter 7. Some Systems Questions

Notes
Appendix
FURTHER READING

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Page 154

Chapter 5. Breaking Down Observations









In this chapter we propose to discuss ways in which the limited mental
powers of observers influence the observations they make. This difficult task is
made doubly difficult by the psychological resistance that we encounter
whenever we start to speak of the human being as limited in any way—but
particularly in mental ways. Most people grudgingly accept that they are unable
to flap their arms and fly, but intellectual people raise their hackles at the mere
mention of limits to the intellect.

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