Download Advanced Photoshop Premium Collection Vol 10 - 2015 UK PDF

TitleAdvanced Photoshop Premium Collection Vol 10 - 2015 UK
File Size15.3 MB
Total Pages180
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Volume 10

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Photomanipulation 3D & Photoshop Digital painting Photo editing Graphics and web

New
for

2015

PREMIUM COLLECTION

assets worth
over £180FREE

Photoshop tutorials, fonts, brushes & textures

Page 90

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15. CREATE
COMPELLING
CHARACTERS
It doesn’t matter how good your art, your
dialogue or even your story is if you haven’t got a
captivating protagonist to put on the page. As in
most films and TV, it helps if they’re active and
look striking enough to be memorable. To keep
her characters strong, Mako Fufu says she
“usually [has] either some model sheets or at
least illustrations of them; they are a good
reference, especially when the character is new

(or new to you), had a major transformation, or
you have a large amount of characters
appearing in the same comic. As you get

familiar with the character, it gets easier.
But at the same time you should allow
some change since the character may
mutate and evolve, because due to the
repetition and practice your own style
mutates and evolves. I enjoy comparing the
first and the latest episodes from mangas

like Berserk, where the artist was amazing
to start with, and he got even better as the

story progressed.”

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Page 91

David Nakayama says, “When it comes to style, I’m sort of a weird
case. I’m constantly playing with different styles – traditional comic
line art, photoreal painting, bold graphic shapes – always trying to
find the perfect custom look for each project I’m working on.” And it’s
on the cover of comics that this look really has to come together.

“As a cover artist,” says Nakayama, “I use colour in a few different
ways. For one, colour can help with the separation of elements in
your image, controlling how clearly it ‘reads’ for the viewer. Secondly,
colour can establish an emotional tone. So red conveys heat, anger,
and rolling motion, while cooler hues might give a sense of placidity
or sadness. Lastly, colour helps to focus attention. For example, I like
to save the brightest, most saturated colours for the most important
area of the image. If surrounded by duller, less intense colours, the
viewer’s eye will naturally go right there… it’s rare these days to have
any text on the cover other than the logo. So it’s sometimes possible
to stand out simply by using a text element that’s integrated into the
art. That’s always fun. In the case of interior panel art, I personally
prefer to use text as a supporting device and let the art itself do most
of the heavy lifting. Sometimes, a scene with no text at all can speak
the loudest.”

Daniel de Sosa admits: “I used to rely on colour to hide weak
drawings and paper over cracks, but now I just use it to accentuate a
piece. I mostly create work in black and white now, adding colour
overlays in via Photoshop only towards the end of working on a
piece. My comics improved a lot when I stopped using colour and
focused only on creating pages in black and white, and I recommend
this to all cartoonists who are just starting out. A piece should stand
on its own without colour. My stance on colour also has to do with
the fact that I self-publish most of my work, and printing in black and
white costs a fraction of the cost that printing in full colour does.
Basically, my view is if you are going to take the time to colour
something, make it count.”

The most challenging project Svetlana
Chmakova has worked on was “the manga
adaptation of James Patterson’s Witch & Wizard.
Not only because I had to fit an entire prose book
per just one manga volume, but also because the
settings were much more varied and different
than what I would usually write for myself. This
was a great opportunity for artistic growth,
because I was challenged to draw things I
normally would avoid!”

But even if Chmakova is working on her own
project, the feedback of others is vital: “I start
writing with concept sketches and snippets of
dialogue, which I then shape and type up into a
detailed script, complete with page breaks and
scene descriptions. I then sketch the script out as
storyboards/rough page layouts, so that I can get
a feel for the visual flow of the story. I usually
adjust the script a lot at this point, because what
looks good in the script may not necessarily
work as well visually. Once I am happy with my
storyboard, I send it to my editor for feedback,
and make further story adjustments as needed.”

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16. COVER YOURSELF

18. MAKE COLOUR COUNT

17. COLLABORATE

19. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
“Before starting the comic,” says Daniel de Sosa, “it’s good to have a model sheet
worked out, where you draw the character from different angles, and work out
various facial expressions. When designing a new character, I make sure to practise
drawing them over and over in my sketchbook until I can get them consistent and
have a good feel for showing their personality. These model sheets are also useful
to compare character sizes and heights so that it stays consistent. Overall though, it
is best not to worry too much about this. Storytelling trumps all, and the more you
draw your character the more consistent they will become until eventually it will
become second nature to you. Just look at Homer Simpson in the first episodes of
The Simpsons, to how he appears today. He looks very, very different, but everyone
still knows it’s the same character.”

Advanced Photoshop Premium Collection 091

TIPS FOR COMIC ARTISTS

Page 180

PREMIUM COLLECTION
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Make creative
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Transform the everyday into the
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12 tutorials so you can
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featured in this book

400 assorted high resolution
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142 Photoshop brushes from
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260 fi re explosion and
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Premium fonts

Master the art of
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VOLUME 10

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