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TitleAdolescents Living with HIV
LanguageEnglish
File Size4.8 MB
Total Pages148
Document Text Contents
Page 1

unite for
children

Adolescents
Living

with
HIV:

Developing and Strengthening

Care and Support Services

Page 2

Adolescents
Living with HIV:

Commissioned by the UNICEF Regional Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the
Commonwealth of Independent States (UNICEF RO CEECIS)

The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the contributors, and do not
necessarily reflect the policies or views of UNICEF.

The designations employed in this publication and the presentation of the material
do not imply on the part of UNICEF the expression of any opinion whatsoever
concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities or the
delimitations of its frontiers.

The subjects in the photographs used throught this publication are models who
have no relation to the content.

Extracts from this publication may be freely reproduced with due acknowledgement
using the following reference: UNICEF, 2016. Adolescents Living with HIV: Developing
and Strengthening Care and Support Services, Geneva: UNICEF Regional Office for
Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CEECIS).

For further information and to download this or any other publication, please visit the
UNICEF CEECIS website at www.unicef.org/ceecis.

All correspondence should be addressed to:
UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS
HIV Section
Palais des Nations
CH 1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland

Copyright: © 2016 United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

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Adolescents Living with HIV:
Developing and Strengthening Care and Support Services

Remember how fearful many people are
about talking about HIV. C&ALHIV may
say ‘we want to go bowling and for pizza,’
but this might be because they have
never been allowed to openly discuss
and ask questions about HIV. HIV support

groups must do this and empower these
children and adolescents to be able to
manage a life with HIV without fear.

Work with doctors and nurses, as clinics are where you will find all the C&ALHIV.

Offer them something they want or need, whether this is meeting up with others,
fun activities or basics such as a hot meal.

Be imaginative and use different methods to engage them. Some will prefer an
online questionnaire on a tablet computer, others a one-to-one interview; some
will enjoy getting together as a group whereas others may respond to an outing
to an amusement park or a Christmas party.

Never presume literacy. Use art, drama and physical activities to engage them in
the process and if someone responds badly to written activities, it may just be
because they struggle to read or write, so always have other possibilities available.

Always place consultations in the realities of the context: what money is available,
what facilities you have access to, and staffing levels. Be honest from the beginning
and do not promise things you cannot provide.

Questions to ask in a consultation:

What support do you feel you need?

Where would you like that support to happen?

How often and what times of day would suit you?

If a group is geographically isolated, ask them ‘how would you bring this group
together?’

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Adolescents Living with HIV:
Developing and Strengthening Care and Support Services

REFERENCES

[1] UNAIDS (2013). Global Report. UNAIDS

[2] WHO (2014). Health for the world�s adolescents: A second chance in the second decade.
World Health Organization.

[3] WHO (2011). Guideline on HIV disclosure counselling for children up to 12 years of age.
World Health Organization.

[4] WHO (2014). Adolescent HIV Testing, Counselling And Care: Implementation guidance
for health providers and planners. World Health Organization.

[5] Judd, A., Doerholt, K., Tookey, P.A., Sharland, M., Riordan, A., Menson, E., Novelli,
V., Lyall, E.G., Masters, J., Tudor-Williams, G., Duong, T., Gibb, D.M., Collaborative HIV
Paediatric Study (CHIPS), National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC)
(2007). Morbidity, mortality, and response to treatment by children in the United Kingdom
and Ireland with perinatally acquired HIV infection during 1996�2006: planning for
teenage and adult care. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 45(7), 918–24.

[6] Judd, A., Ferrand, R., Jungmann, E., Foster, C., Masters, J., Rice, B., Lyall, H., Tookey, P.,
Prime, K. (2009). Vertically acquired HIV diagnosed in adolescence and early adulthood in
the UK and Ireland: �ndings from national surveillance. HIV Medicine, 10(4), 253–6.

[7] Foster, C., Judd, A., Tookey, P., Tudor-Williams, G., Dunn, D., Shingadia, D., Butler, K.,
Sharland, M., Gibb, D., Lyall, H., Collaborative HIV Paediatric Study (CHIPS) (2009). Young
people in the UK and Ireland with perinatally acquired HIV: the paediatric legacy for adult
services. AIDS Patient Care STDs, 23(3), 159-66.

[8] McDonald, S. (2011). HYPNet adherence audit. BHIVA.

[9] Cohen, M.S., McCauley, M., Gamble, T. (2012). HIV treatment as prevention and HPTN
052. USA: Curr Opin HIV AIDS, 7(2): 99-105.

Rodger, A., et al. (2014). HIV Transmission Risk Through Condomless Sex If HIV+ Partner
On Suppressive ART: PARTNER Study. Abstract 153LB, CROI 2014, Boston, MA, March 3-6,
2014.

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