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TitleAccount-giving in the narratives of personal experience in Sepedi
LanguageEnglish
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Table of Contents
                            Sekhoela_part1.doc
	Study leader:  Dr M Dlali
		DECEMBER 2006
		DEDICATION
Sekhoela_part2.doc
	2.1.1.4 Politeness as an utterance level phenomenon
		2.1.1.5 Politeness as a pragmatic phenomenon
			‘He is a man because he is wearing a pair of trousers’
		3.1 RHETORICAL APPROACHES TO IMAGE RESTORATION
		3.4 USAGE OF ACCOUNTS
		3.5 HONOURING OF ACCOUNTS
		3.6 ACCOUNTS AS SPEECH ACTS
		3.7 THEORY IN IMAGE RESTORATION
		3.9 IMAGE RESTORATION DISCOURSE
		3.10 TYPOLOGY OF IMAGE RESTORATION STRATEGIES
			3.11 THE RELATIONSHIP OF ATTACK AND DEFENCE
				4.1 INTRODUCTION
		4.2 ACCOUNT AND ACCOUNT-MAKING IN VARIOUS LITERATURES
		4.2.1 Review of Relevant Scholarly Literature
		4.2.2 First Explicit treatments
		4.2.6 Mainstream attribution work
		4.3 A THEORETICAL CONCEPTION OF ACCOUNT – MAKING IN RESPONSE TO SEVERE STRESS
		4.3.1 The nature of severe stress and its study
		4.3.4 Memory – cognition
		4.3.5 Behavioural expectation
		4.3.6 Future research agenda
		4.4 PERSON PERCEPTION THROUGH ACCOUNTS
		4.4.1 Perception based on Accounts
		4.4.2 Theoretical conception
		4.4.4 The stimulus account
		4.4.5 Implications for the account making literature
		4.4.6 Future experimental directions
		4.5 ACCOUNT IN LITERARY FORM
		4.5.1 Characteristics of  literary accounts
			(i)  Literary Account are Precipitated
		4.5.2 Functions of Literary Accounts
		4.5.3 Themes of Literary Accounts
		4.6.2 How Accounts are constructed. The Role of Goals in Constructing Accounts
			4.6.3 Preliminary Steps in Constructing an Account
		4.6.4 Bringing it All Together: Construct the Account
		Step 1: Activation of Related Concepts
		Step 2: Arriving at a Coherent Representation
			4.6.5 Honouring the Account
			(c) Are Reproaches Necessary?
			(d) Reproach forms and the Reproach-Account Phase
			4.6.6 Different Types of Severe Reproaches
				Needed research
		4.7.3 Characteristics of the Actor – Reproacher Relationship
			5.1 SELF NARRATION IN SOCIAL LIFE
				5.1.2 Structuring of Narrative Accounts
				5.1.3 Varieties of Narrative Form
				5.1.4 Narrative Form and the Generation of Drama
				5.1.5 Narrative Form in Two Populations: An Application
				5.1.6 Micro, Macro and Multiplicity in Narration
				5.1.7 The Pragmatics of Self Narrative
				5.1.8 The Interknitting of Identities
				5.2 EMOTION AS RELATIONSHIP
		Cause 1: Separation of parents
			The narrative of the first event
			THE SECOND EVENT
			The narrative of the second event
			THE THIRD EVENT
			The narrative of the third event
			THE FOURTH EVENT
			The narrative of the fourth
			THE FIFTH EVENT
			The narrative of the fifth event
			THE SIXTH EVENT
			THE SEVENTH EVENT
			The narrative of the seventh event
			1.2 ENDPOINT: THEME OF THE NARRATIVE
			The narrative of the third event
		ANALYSIS OF CHILDHOOD STORY NO.4
			EVENT 1
			The narrative of the first event
			EVENT 2
			The narrative of the second event
			EVENT 3
			The narrarative of the third event
			EVENT 4
			The narrative of the fourth event
				Cause 3   :  the torturing by his uncle
		SEPEDI VERSION
		ENGLISH VERSION
		ANALYSES OF CHILDHOOD STORY NO.5
			None
		CONCLUSION
			ANALYSIS OF ACCOUNTS
Bibsekhoela.doc
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

ACCOUNT-GIVING IN THE NARRATIVES OF
PERSONAL EXPERIENCE IN SEPEDI








BY







WILLIAM GODWRIGHT SEKHOELA






Thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of

Arts at the University of Stellenbosch.








Study leader: Dr M Dlali






DECEMBER 2006

Page 2

i

DECLARATION




I, the undersigned hereby declare that the work in this thesis is my own original work

and that I have not previously in its entirety or in part submitted it at any university for a

degree.















________________________________ _______________

Signature Date

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5.1.6 Micro, Macro and Mu ltiplicity in Narration

The common participation in the culture will typically expose a wide variety of narrative

forms from the rudimentary to the complex. We enter relationships with the potential to

use any of a wide number of forms. We can contrast the relationship among our life

experiences in various ways.

There are no necessary temporal parameters within which a personal narrative must be

constructed. Therefore in general we may assume that one may relate events over vast

periods of time or tell a story of brief duration. Macronarratives refer to accounts in which

events span broad periods of time. Micronarratives relate to events of brief duration.

Narratives may also be nested, that is one within another. An example of this could be a

progressive narrative within a tragic narrative. Culture prizes consistency among

narratives, as it seems to lay foundations for the construction of other narratives.

Gergen (1994) raps the discussion by sensing the acts of terrorism as the example of

coherence among nested narratives. He states that people with an extended sense of

their own history may strive for more coherence between one narrative and another,

than those with a superficial sense of the past.

5.1.7 The Pragmatics of Self Narrative

Narrative constructions are linguistic tools with important social functions. People often

wish to know that others “are what they seem,” by conveying narrative of stability.

Personal traits, moral character and identity of the self are the results or outcomes of

relationship itself.

Society places strong value on charge and stability. Even stabilization may be

characterized as problematic, oppressive or odious. Progressive narrative is the result of

continuous career change or problem experienced in a relationship. Progressive

narrative plays a useful function in social life. In view of this, Gergen (1994) further state

that one must be able to show that one has always been the same and will continue to

be so.

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Lastly, regressive narrative serves as an important means for motivating people toward

achieving positive ends.

5.1.8 The Interknitting of Identities

Self-narratives are immersed within processes of ongoing interchange. They serve to

unite the past with the present and signifying the future that sets foundation for moral

evaluation.

Narrative performance also sets stage for further interdependence. Therefore as

narrative generates expectations, the question may arise as to whether actions measure

up to expectations. Maintaining identity is an interminable challenge. Gergen (1994)

projects the incident of interknitting by stating that the actions of others contribute vitally

to the events linked in narrative sequence. Narrative validity depends on the affirmation

of others. According to Schopp’s (1976), each of us in “knitted into” the historical

constructions of others just as they are into ours.

5.2 EMOTION AS RELATIONSHIP

According to Gergen’s (1994) demonstration, emotions can be seen or viewed features

not of individuals but of relationships. A number of discourses on the self have been

accumulated. The sharing of concepts by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke and

Augustine, Hobbes and Pascal, show times or concepts. For example, the concept of

abstract ideas by Plato now changed to prototype, the concept of logical form by

Aristotle that emerged as cognitive heuristics, social strategy by Machiavelli now

emerging as impression management.

He further states that theories of the self inform society about what the individual can do

or not. What hopes can be nurtured for future change? Conception of the self played an

important role in human affairs. Emotions such as self-esteem set the stage for

injustices in American civil right legislation.

Moving further, perception cognition or emotion informs the public that the mind of the

individual is crucial to cultural well being. Citing what psychologists say about these

concepts, Gergen (1994) reveals that the concept of self esteem and measures of

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