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Loyola University Chicago Loyola University Chicago

Loyola eCommons Loyola eCommons

Dissertations Theses and Dissertations

2013

A Phenomenological Study of Indonesian Cohort Group's A Phenomenological Study of Indonesian Cohort Group's

Transformative Learning Transformative Learning

Markus Budiraharjo
Loyola University Chicago

Follow this and additional works at: https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_diss

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Budiraharjo, Markus, "A Phenomenological Study of Indonesian Cohort Group's Transformative Learning"
(2013). Dissertations. 507.
https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_diss/507

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Page 2

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO

A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF AN INDONESIAN COHORT GROUP’S

TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING

A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO

THE FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

IN CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE OF

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION

PROGRAM IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

BY

MARKUS BUDIRAHARJO


CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

MAY 2013

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parents visited the school to protest the harsh punishments on their children. They

asked the school to inform where Bagyo lived, so that they could directly file a complaint

to him. The school still protected him. The address was not given, and he received the

first warning from the school.

This incident became a catalyst for him. It made him aware of his own

motivation to be a teacher, namely serving and salvaging children, not harming them.

In his reflection, he felt so grateful. His school still protected him, the complaints from

parents were well handled, and no injuries among children were detected. The day after

the complaints filed by the parents, he apologized to his students. He felt how guilty he

was, and he could not help weeping in front of his students. This incident suddenly

transformed him to be a different man: never using corporal punishment any longer.

Undergoing a teaching profession meant serving a role model for other people to

look at. Bagyo applied this principle very well for himself. He kept learning from his

encounters with various people with different skills, knowledge, and ability. He

continually sought to learn and improve himself in order to better serve other people.

His being highly motivated drove him to invest in many personal pursuits. His love-to-

learn attitude made him a true risk-taker, which in turn has been taken into consideration

by his office. He has been frequently entrusted to join in a number of trainings

conducted by the Central Office. Prior to joining in the ISEDP team, he served six years

an elementary classroom teacher. He then spent another six years serving as a school

principal in two different schools. Another five years was spent as a special staff at

Central STRADA Foundation. His eagerness to engage in self-development programs

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made him feel prepared anytime his office assigned him in a new post. He admitted that

English was one of his weakest points. However, his nature of being highly energetic,

coupled with his risk-taking skills, made him feel comfortable joining in this group.

Bergas

Name Bergas

Subject taught English

Teaching experience 11 years

Teaching profession was never an option for Bergas. As his uncle had warned,

teaching was a misery, given the fact that the amount of remuneration obtained was

small. Thus, despite obtaining bachelor’s degree majoring in English education, Bergas

never had any single idea of being a teacher. Upon his completion of his college in

2000, he sought to apply for a job in companies. He avoided applying for teaching job.

He joined a number of entry-job tests in some companies, and the results were

remarkably consistent: his math skills were inadequate. Even, in one of the IQ tests, he

was identified to score 99 in math. His poor math skills prevented him from obtaining a

job in companies. He eventually turned to teaching job, which he disliked. Before

deciding to teach in one of Jesuit High School in the Capital City, he taught in two

institutions, namely as a teacher in an international school and as an English instructor at

a higher education institution.

Although Bergas’ entry into the teaching profession was not smooth, his

professional journey reflected a dynamics that eventually purified his motivation as a

teacher. He taught in a senior high school having a strong intellectual tradition. Most

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VITA

Markus Budiraharjo is a faculty member of the English Language Education

Program of Sanata Dharma University (SDU), Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Upon the

completion of his B.Ed. from SDU in 1999, he started to teach English in his alma mater.

He earned his first M.Ed. in the area of Language, Literacy and Cultural Program in 2003

from the School of Education, Boston University, MA with the sponsorship from The

Kelly Elizabeth Stephens Memorial Scholarship. He earned his second M.Ed. in the area

of Instructional Leadership from Loyola University Chicago in 2009, together with the

other 11 cohort group members of the Indonesia Secondary Education Program (ISEDP)

initiative.

He started his doctoral classes in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction,

School of Education, Loyola University Chicago, in the Fall 2009. In his early teaching

career, he focused more on English instruction. His presentations in both national and

international conferences and his published articles included writing and reading skills’

instruction. However, his role and responsibility as Associate Dean of Student Affairs

(2004-2005) of the School of Education, SDU, led him to focus on school improvements

and curricular changes of grade schools. Upon his return from Chicago in the mid-2011,

he joined the instructional leadership training program managed by the Indonesian Jesuit

High Schools Association (IJHSA) in collaboration with the School of Education, SDU.

Page 248

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE



The Dissertation submitted by Markus Budiraharjo has been read and approved by the
following committee:




Michael Boyle, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Education
Loyola University Chicago


David Ensminger, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Education
Loyola University Chicago


Tarsisius Sarkim, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Education
Sanata Dharma University

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