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TitleA Guide to the Latin American Art Song Repertoire: An Annotated Catalog of Twentieth-Century Art Songs for Voice and Piano (Indiana Repertoire Guides)
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.8 MB
Total Pages369
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Argentina
2 Bolivia
3 Brazil
4 Chile
5 Colombia
6 Costa Rica
7 Cuba
8 Dominican Republic
9 Ecuador
10 El Salvador
11 Guatemala
12 Haiti
13 Honduras
14 Jamaica
15 Mexico
16 Nicaragua
17 Panama
18 Paraguay
19 Peru
20 Puerto Rico
21 Uruguay
22 Venezuela
Appendix A: List of Countries and Regions in Latin America
Appendix B: Statistics by Geographic Region
Appendix C: List of Publishers
Appendix D: List of Suggested Repertoire
Notes
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index of General Subjects and Song Composers
Index of Poets and Text Sources
Index of Song and Song Cycle Titles
Index of Tessituras and Voice Types
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

An Annotated Catalog of
Twentieth-Century Art Songs

for Voice and Piano

A Gu i de t o t h e

Latin American
A rt SonG r epe rt oi r e

Edited by M AyA HooV Er

H
oover

t

t

t

Indiana Repertoire Guides

INDIANA
University Press
Bloomington & Indianapolis
www.iupress.indiana.edu
1-800-842-6796

IN
D

IA
N

A
A

G
uide to the Latin

A
m

erican
A

rt Son
g R

epertoire

Music Introduces art song literature and
composers from Latin America

A reference guide to the vast array of art song
literature and composers from Latin America,
this book presents the music of Latin America
from a singer’s perspective and provides a basis
for research into the songs of this richly musical
area of the world. The book is divided by country
into 22 chapters, with each chapter containing an
introductory essay on the music of the region, a
catalog of art songs for that country, and a list of
publishers. Some chapters include information on
additional sources. Singers and teachers may use
descriptive annotations (language, poet) or peda-
gogical annotations (range, tessitura) to determine
which pieces are appropriate for their voices or
programming needs, or those of their students. The
guide will be a valuable resource for vocalists and
researchers, however familiar they may be with
this glorious repertoire.

Maya Hoover is Assistant Professor of Voice at
the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, and serves
on the Advisory Board of the Latin American Art
Song Alliance. Her publications have appeared in
Classical Singer, The Mentoring Connection, and the
Philosophy of Music Education Review.

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GuideLAASRmec.indd 1 1/20/10 2:04 PM

Page 2

A Guide to the Latin American
Art Song Repertoire

Page 184

159

10

El Salvador

El Salvador is sorely under-represented in the existing literature. Al-
though several attempts have been made to correct this problem, there
remains a noticeable gap in the area of research and published compo-
sitions. A committee was established in 1942 with the hopes of rectify-
ing this situation; however, the results were unsatisfactory. A further
attempt was made by María de Baratta with Jeremías Mendoza in the
two-volume publication Cuzcatlán típico: Ensayo sobre etnofonía de El
Salvador, folklore, folkwisa, y folkway. Nicolas Slonimsky’s forward-look-
ing announcement of the committee’s initial study in his 1945 publica-
tion proved overly optimistic, although Baratta’s work seems to be an
improvement.1 Slonimsky discusses El Salvador briefly, but the country
is completely missing from Béhague’s Music in Latin America.2 From
the existing literature, the following conclusions can be drawn: the in-
struments and dances common to Central America in general, such as
the danza, pasillo, and marcha, are prevalent in El Salvador; and the
nineteenth-century musical scene was dominated by Italian musicians,
who brought leadership and education in the Western style with them.
The first orchestra, the Sociedad Orquestal Salvadoreña, was also di-
rected by an Italian, Antonio Gianoli.3

Some earlier composers, who in general incorporate indigenous
melodies into their music, include Ciriaco Jesús Alas (1866–?), a voice
teacher who seems to have written mostly larger scale works; the Ital-
ian-schooled Domingo Santos (1892–?); María Mendoza de Baratta
(1890–1978), an important figure in the preservation of El Salvadorian
culture; and the composer and voice teacher José Napoleón Rodríguez
(1901–).4

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a guide to the latin a mer ica n art song r epertoir e

160

Cáceres, German Gustavo, 1954–

10.1, Cartas interdimensionales
10.1a, I. [Las estrellas binarias . . . ], 2004,

Juana Rosa Pita, A3–G5, High, —, —,
LCP, —

10.1b, II. [Los poemas que al verbo se re-
sisten . . . ], 2004, Juana Rosa Pita, A3–G5,
High, —, —, LCP, —

10.1c, III. [Estos ojos que ahora están
mirándo . . . ], 2004, Juana Rosa Pita,
B b3–G5, High, —, —, LCP, —

10.2, Cuatro canciones para soprano y piano
10.2a, I. Si un niño muere en la guerra, 1981,

Álvaro Menéndez-Leal, B3–A 5, High,
Soprano, —, PEN, The Art Song in Latin
America, +

10.2b, II. Apunte, 1981, Álvaro Menéndez-
Leal, C4–G5, High, Soprano, —, —,
LCP, —

10.2c, III. Canción de cuna, 1981, Álvaro
Menéndez-Leal, F4–A5, High, Soprano,
—, —, LCP, —

10.2d, IV. Preguntas, 1981, Álvaro
Menéndez-Leal, B b3–A5, High, Soprano,
—, —, LCP, —

10.3, Cuatro canciones para soprano y piano
10.3a, I. [Sos un sueño . . . ], 1999, —, C4–

F5, High, Soprano, —, —, LCP, —
10.3b, II. [Cuando haya tomado . . . ],

1999, —, B3–F5, High, Soprano, —, —,
LCP, —

10.3c, III. [Si alguna vez . . . ], 1999, —, B3–
G5, High, Soprano, —, —, LCP, —

10.3d, IV. [Adios de deo clausurar . . . ],
1999, —, C4–A5, High, Soprano, —, —,
LCP, —

10.4, Elegía de junio
10.4a, I. Fin de un sueño, 2005, Cristóbal

Humberto Ibarra, A 3–F5, Med, —, —,
LCP, —

10.4b, II. Alta noche, 2005, Cristóbal
Humberto Ibarra, A 3–F5, Med, —, —,
LCP, —

10.4c, III. Llora un niño, 2005, Cristóbal
Humberto Ibarra, G3–G5, Med, —, —,
LCP, —

10.4d, IV. Madrugada, 2005, Cristóbal
Humberto Ibarra, B3–G5, Med, —, —,
LCP, —

10.4e, V. La euforia nos nace y muere aden-
tro, 2005, Cristóbal Humberto Ibarra,
F4–G5, Med-high, —, —, LCP, —

10.5, El señor de la casa del tiempo
10.5a, I. [Pero cómo habríamos de perman-

ecer aquí . . . ], 1996, Ricardo Lindo, B3–
A b5, High, Soprano, —, —, LCP, —

10.5b, II. [Desciende, gris, de las olas lentas
del aire . . . ], 1996, Ricardo Lindo, C4–
G5, High, Soprano, —, —, LCP, —

10.5c, III. [Ceniza, lluvia, vino, . . . ], 1996,
Ricardo Lindo, C4–G5, High, Soprano,
—, —, LCP, —

Modern composers from this country also exist, such as serial-
ist Gilberto Orellana (1942–).5 German Gustavo Cáceres (1954–), an-
other important modern composer and conductor, was educated in
the United States but returned to El Salvador to maintain important
positions in the musical life there.6 His numerous vocal compositions
are listed in this catalog, and he is currently the only El Salvadorian
member of The Living Composers Project.7

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index of tessitur as a nd voice t ypes

343

21.33, 21.34, 21.35, 21.37, 21.38, 21.39, 21.41,
21.42, 21.43, 21.44, 21.47, 21.49, 21.50, 21.54a,
21.54d, 21.54e, 21.54f

Medium—22 (Venezuela): 22.7, 22.10b, 22.10c,
22.10d, 22.10e, 22.10f, 22.10g, 22.10h, 22.11,
22.13a, 22.13b, 22.15d, 22.15f, 22.15h, 22.16

Low-medium, 1.319, 2.5c, 2.6, 2.9c, 3.792a,
3.792c, 3.792d, 3.792e, 3.1170a, 3.1170b,
3.1170d, 3.1170e, 3.1171a, 3.1171b, 3.1190,
3.1549c, 3.1549d, 3.1549, 4.23b, 6.1, 6.5, 6.42,
15.2a, 15.2b, 15.6, 15.12, 15.14, 15.15, 15.41b,
15.52, 15.63, 15.78d, 15.78b, 15.791, 15.79k,
20.30b, 21.26

Low, 1.57, 1.58, 1.62, 1.310, 1.330i, 1.335c,
1.346d, 2.5a, 3.789, 3.800, 3.1170c, 3.1180,
3.1195a, 3.1316c, 3.1316, 4.1a, 4.1b, 4.1c, 4.1f,
4.22, 5.7, 5.29, 6.66, 6.82d, 6.82b, 6.82e, 6.83a,
6.83b, 6.83c, 6.84, 11.29, 15.29a, 15.29b,
15.29c, 15.29d, 15.29e, 15.68, 15.69a, 15.70a,
15.75d, 15.79i, 15.79d, 15.79e, 15.79h, 15.79j,
20.3, 22.3

Songs by Voice Type
(as indicated by composers)

Soprano—2 (Bolivia): 2.10c, 2.11a, 2.11b, 2.11c
Soprano—3 (Brazil): 3.787, 3.791, 3.796, 3.797,

3.801, 3.805, 3.806, 3.1015, 3.1016, 3.1019,
3.1021, 3.1025, 3.1026, 3.1028, 3.1122a,
3.1122c, 3.1414, 3.1415a, 3.1415b, 3.1415c,
3.1415d, 3.1415e, 3.1421, 3.1424, 3.1426,
3.1456e, 3.1459, 3.1508, 3.1540, 3.1544,
3.1546, 3.1548, 3.1550

Soprano—4 (Chile): 4.4, 4.5, 4.7, 4.17, 4.18, 4.20,
4.29, 4.30, 4.33

Soprano—5 (Colombia): 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.12, 5.13,
5.69

Soprano—6 (Costa Rica): 6.11, 6.12

Soprano—7 (Cuba): 7.4, 7.5, 7.9, 7.10, 7.11, 7.12,
7.13

Soprano—8 (Dominican Republic): 8.2, 8.3
Soprano—10 (El Salvador): 10.2, 10.3, 10.5, 10.8,

10.9, 10.10
Soprano—12 (Haiti): 12.11
Soprano—13 (Honduras): 13.2
Soprano—14 (Jamaica): 14.2
Soprano—15 (Mexico): 15.22, 15.45a, 15.45b,

15.74
Soprano—19 (Peru): 19.2
Soprano—20 (Puerto Rico): 20.8
Soprano—21 (Uruguay): 21.45, 21.46
Soprano—22 (Venezuela): 22.1

Mezzo-Soprano, 3.788, 3.790, 3.798, 3.802,
3.1122c, 3.1122b, 3.1160, 3.1166, 3.1173,
3.1185, 3.1197, 3.1400, 3.1402, 3.1405, 3.1406,
3.1407, 3.1410, 3.1411, 3.1417, 3.1423, 4.2, 6.81,
7.8, 7.9, 15.7a, 15.7b, 15.12, 15.19, 15.21, 15.43,
15.44, 15.45c, 15.46, 15.48, 15.49, 19.14, 22.2,
22.9

Contralto (Alto), 2.10c, 3.808, 3.1419, 3.1549c,
3.1549d, 3.1549b, 4.14, 7.3, 7.6, 15.20, 22.3

Tenor, 3.795, 3.799, 3.806, 3.1052, 3.1546, 3.1548,
3.1550, 4.13, 4.15, 4.16, 4.19, 4.38, 4.40, 5.1, 5.2,
14.1, 15.31, 15.74, 18.1, 21.45, 21.46, 22.17

Baritone, 1.65b, 3.788, 3.790, 3.793, 3.802, 3.804,
3.1013, 3.1014, 3.1017, 3.1018, 3.1020, 3.1022,
3.1425, 3.1508, 3.1547, 3.1549b, 3.1549c,
3.1549d, 4.6, 4.11, 4.31, 5.29, 7.40, 9.3, 11.29,
12.4a, 12.4b, 12.5, 15.7a, 15.12, 15.23, 22.9a

Bass, 3.1184, 4.9, 4.10, 15.29

Bass clef, 1.19, 1.20, 7.17b, 7.18, 15.70b, 22.10a

Page 369

Mezzo-soprano Maya Hoover is an active performer, teacher, cli-
nician, music education philosopher, and author. Her accomplish-
ments in the performance and teaching arenas have earned her in-
vitations to appear around the world, and her specialty in the music
of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries has led her to collabo-
rations with some of today’s leading composers. Hoover serves on
the Advisory Board of the Latin American Art Song Alliance, and
her publications have appeared in Classical Singer, The Mentoring
Connection, and the Philosophy of Music Education Review. She holds
a Doctor of Music degree in voice performance and literature with a
minor in music education from Indiana University, and is currently
Assistant Professor of Voice at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.

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