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TitleA Clinical Guide to Essential Oil Therapeutics
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.7 MB
Total Pages402
Table of Contents
                            Aromatica Volume 1 by Peter Holmes
	Foreword by Gabriel Mojay
	Foreword by Tiffany Carole Pollard
	Foreword by Charles Lev
	Acknowledgements
	Introduction
	1. Exploring the 
Roots of the 
Materia Aromatica
	2. Examining the Sources of Essential Oils
	3. Defining 
Essential Oils as Bioactive Remedies
	4. Issues of 
Essential Oil Safety
	5. Surveying the Modalities of Essential Oil Therapy
	6. The Essential Oil Profile
	Materia Aromatica, Part I
		Atlas Cedarwood
		Bergamot
		Black Spruce
		Blue Tansy
		Cajeput
		Clary Sage
		Eucalyptus
			Blue-Gum Eucalyptus
			Narrow-Leaf Eucalyptus
		Geranium
		German Camomile
		Ginger
		Helichrysum
		Juniper Berry
		Lavender
		Lemon
		Lemongrass
		Mandarin
		Marjoram
		May Chang
		Palmarosa
		Patchouli
		Peppermint
		Ravintsara
		Roman Camomile
		Rosemary ct. Cineole and ct. Camphor
		Siberian Fir
		Spearmint
		Tea Tree
		Thyme ct. Linalool
		Vetiver
		Ylang Ylang No. 1 and Ylang Ylang Extra
	Selective Bibliography
	Glossary of Terms
	Common Name Cross Index
	Index
	Essential Oils Index
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

PETER HOLMES LAc, MH

Volume 1: Principles And Profiles

AROMATICA
A Clinical Guide to Essential Oil Therapeutics

The first of two volumes, this comprehensive text builds an
important foundation for essential oil therapy and includes profiles

of the 30 most important essential oils used in practice.

Taking a truly holistic approach, this detailed database compares different approaches to
essential oil therapeutics. Skilfully blending the evidence of scientific research with that
of clinical practice, the book builds a comprehensive therapeutic profile of each oil. Based
on the different administration methods used and the absorption pathways activated,
the extensive Materia Medica section differentiates the psychological, physiological and
topical uses of these essential oils.

‘Peter Holmes has done it again. In his usual style, he has produced a useful clinical text
on use of volatile oils. Rather than focusing on documenting everything in the medical
literature, he has focused on all the practical aspects of these oils and just enough science
and history to keep it all in context.’
ERIC YARNELL, ND, RH(AHG), ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, DEPT. OF
BOTANICAL MEDICINE, BAST YR UNIVERSIT Y, KENMORE, WA

‘It is the eclectic, integrated nature of this exposition that makes Aromatica an indispensable
source of reliable information on the energetic and symptomatic therapeutics of essential
oils. The fact that these faculties are discussed with eloquence and lucidity, as well as a
deep appreciation of the provenance, potency and olfactory subtlety of essential oils,
instils this opus with the excellence of artisanship.’
FROM THE FOREWORD BY GABRIEL MOJAY, LICAC, CERTED,
FIFPA, FOUNDING CO - CHAIR OF THE INTERNATIONAL
FEDERATION OF PROFESSIONAL AROMATHERAPISTS ( IFPA)

PETER HOLMES, L AC, MH , is a medical herbalist, essential oil therapist and
Chinese medicine practitioner with over 30 years of extensive education, clinical practice
and teaching experience. He is the author of several herbal medicine textbooks books
and teaches for Snow Lotus Seminars on the energetic and clinical use of essential oils.
His website is snowlotus.org. Peter is the co-founder, with Tiffany Carole Pollard, of
Aroma Acupoint Therapy™.

Cover design: Rosamund Bird

A
R
O

M
A
T

IC
A

PETER
HOLMES
LAc, MH

73 Collier Street
London N1 9BE, UK

400 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

www.singingdragon.com

SINGING
DRAGON

Page 201

G e r m a n C a m o m i l e

1 9 9

involve nervous tension and circulatory excess, typically presenting symptoms of
spasms, pain, inflammation and heat, usually with mental or emotional irritability or
agitation. Two of the oil’s key constituents, azulene and bisabolol, have both shown
anti-inflammatory, antihistamine and spasmolytic actions. Whereas Roman camomile excels
at treating the spasm and pain aspect of this syndrome, German camomile focuses on
the reduction of inflammation both acute and chronic, regardless of cause. Although
less reliable in its antihistamine action than Blue tansy, it can also help relieve a myriad
immediate allergies, wherever found.

The corollary of this indication on the mental-emotional level is the calming and
anxiety-relieving effect that German camomile achieves. Most conditions of anxiety,
fear, agitation and anger will be helped simply with its use by inhalation or in
a massage session. Moreover, like Blue tansy oil, German camomile exerts a good
stabilizing effect in individuals presenting emotional instability, along with its
many possible distressed emotions. Where emotional conflict is present that expresses
itself as a worry-laden form of rigidity, this oil is particularly helpful. We can imagine
its sweet, green, fluid, soothing energy softening and making flexible the hardness of
mind and attitude. In so doing, German camomile can be an invaluable ally in helping
us deal with life’s obstacles and challenges in a lateral way not bound by habit or fear-
induced rigidity. It can remind us of the problem-free possibility of adapting to these
with a flexible, free-flowing spontaneous response.

Chinese medicine sees all these conditions as resulting from either constrained Qi
with Shen disharmony, particularly with the generation of heat, or from a deficiency of
the Heart and Liver Yin with Shen agitation. Like Helichrysum, German camomile is
excellent for nourishing the energetic Liver presenting irritability, resentment, shallow
restless sleep, etc., as well as for settling the energetic Heart causing anxiety, worry
and insomnia.

There is a secondary but potentially no less important aspect to German camomile
oil that hinges around its ability to regenerate tissue. The remedy’s function as a
vulnerary for wounds and ulcers in herbal medicine is long established, and the essential
oil has shown several extensions of this action with internal and especially gel cap
administration. Its tissue regenerative action has shown excellent results in ulcers of the
upper GI tract and in liver toxicosis (e.g. from metabolic or chemical toxins). The
compound bisabolol has even proven ulcer preventive. This is associated with a general
liver-restorative effect that would seem to include a valuable liver-protective action. Like
Geranium too, German camomile shows promise as an antioxidant antitumoral remedy.

Page 202

2 0 0

Ginger

Botanical source: The root of Zingiber officinalis Roscoe (Zingiberaceae – ginger
family)

Other names: Common ginger, Garden ginger; Jahe (Indonesian), Gingembre (Fr),
Ingwer (Ger), Zenzero (It), Gingibre (Sp), Zangabil (Arabic, Persian), Adrak (Hindi)

Appearance: A mobile yellow to amber fluid with a warm-spicy, mildly lemony odour
with sweet, rooty and sometimes balsamic undertones. The oil becomes less mobile,
i.e. thicker as it ages from oxidation and polymerization.

Perfumery status: A head note of high intensity and medium persistence

Extraction: Steam distillation of the fresh rhizome, usually December through March
An absolute extract is currently also produced from ginger roots. Ginger absolute

is a thick, reddish-amber liquid with a deep, rich spicy-sweet-woody aroma. An
essential oil is also produced as a CO2 extract in Europe; this has a slightly wider
range of chemical components, including the aromatic compounds gingerol and
shogaol that characterise the familar fresh aroma of the root.

1 kg oil yield from: 20–30 kgs of the fresh roots (a very good yield)

Page 401

E s s e n t i a l O i l s I n d e x

3 9 9

sitka (Picea sitchensis) 56, 142
white (Picea glauca) 56, 142, 144

Star anise (Illicium verum) 43, 47, 53
Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum ct.linalool)

50, 58
Sweet fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) 57, 89
Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) 47, 52,

74–5, 91, 110, 136, 253
Swiss pine (Pinus cembra) 56

Tagette (Tagetes glandulifera) 91
Tangerine (Citrus x tangerina) 60, 91,

253
Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) 50,

56, 87
Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) 46, 48,

52–3, 59, 67, 85, 88–9, 107,
110–11, 116–19, 132, 154,
162, 169, 182–3, 198, 213, 222,
234, 248, 258, 275, 277, 283–4,
300–1, 315, 317, 327, 332,
334–43, 348, 350, 352, 358

Tea tree
black (Melaleuca bracteata) 59, 336
broad-leaf (Melaleuca viridiflora)

335–6
citronella (Leptospermum liversidgei)

59, 336
lavender (Melaleuca ericifolia) 52, 59,

228, 335
lemon (Leptospermum petersonii) 52,

59, 88, 90, 336
narrow-leaf (Melaleuca linariifolia)

59, 335
weeping (Melaleuca leucadendra) 59,

156, 336
Texas cedarwood (Juniperus mexicana)

218

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) 23, 50–1, 58,
67, 76, 85, 88–90, 116–18, 159,
161, 181–2, 204, 214, 221–2,
242, 258, 275, 277, 284, 315,
327, 332–3, 338, 340, 344–52

Thyme
caraway (Thymus herna-barona) 58,

346
Cretan (Thymus capitatus) 58, 346
lemon (Thymus x citriodorus) 58, 346
mastic (Thymus mastichina) 58, 346
Moroccan (Thymus satureioides) 345
Spanish sauce (Thymus zygis) 58, 346
Spanish (Thymus mastichina) 58, 346
spiked (Thymus spicata) 58, 346
wild (Thymus serpyllum) 58, 346

Tree basil (Ocimum gratissimum) 58
Tropical basil (Ocimum basilicum ct. methyl

chavicol) 52, 58, 87, 139, 180–1,
213, 234, 292

Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) 25, 39, 46,
52, 61, 70, 107

Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) 52, 58, 350
Turmeric (Curcuma longa) 52, 61, 201,

203

Valerian (Valeriana spp.) 52, 57, 263
Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) 52
Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) 44, 46–7,

51–3, 55, 61, 69, 72, 89, 107,
109–10, 133, 144–6, 153–4,
169, 189, 198, 204, 213–14,
233, 262, 275, 284–5, 309, 340,
350, 353–61

Virginia cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana)
56, 218

Weeping tea tree (Melaleuca leucadendra)
59, 156, 336

White camphor (Cinnamomum camphora)
31, 43, 53, 59, 74, 85, 157, 297

White cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) 51,
56

White ginger lily (Hedychium coronarium)
51

White pine (Pinus strobus) 53, 56
White sage (Salvia apiana) 58
White spruce (Picea glauca) 56, 142, 144
Wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum) 58, 346
Winter savoury (Satureia montana) 33,

50–1, 58, 88, 317
Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) 57,

88–9, 154, 182, 198, 309, 359
Woolly-butt eucalyptus (Eucalyptus

macarthurii) 59, 175

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) 28, 56, 74,
107, 109, 150, 191, 194, 198,
305, 309

Yellow ginger (Hedychium flavescens) 201
Ylang ylang (Cananga odorata forma

genuina) 19, 39–40, 43–5, 51–2,
61, 74, 79–80, 106, 109, 139,
153–4, 169, 197, 212, 234, 250,
255, 260–2, 268, 270, 302,
362–70

Yuzu (Citrus junos) 48, 60, 91

Zdravetz (Geranium macrorrhizum) 60–1
Zinziba (Lippia javanica) 48, 52, 332

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