Download 92892761 Armstrong s Handbook of Management and Leadership PDF

Title92892761 Armstrong s Handbook of Management and Leadership
TagsOrganization Development Leadership & Mentoring Leadership Occupational Safety And Health Competence (Human Resources)
File Size1.3 MB
Total Pages289
Table of Contents
                            Copyright
Table of contents
Preface to the Second Edition
Part I The Practice of Management
	1 The Processes of 
Management and Leadership
		Management
		Leadership
		Management and leadership compared
		Infl uences on management
		References
	2 The Role of the Manager
		What is a manager?
		What do managers do?
		How do managers do it?
		What is an effective manager?
		What do line/middle managers contribute?
		References
	3 The Role of the Leader
		What is a leader?
		Types of leaders
		What do leaders do?
		How do leaders do it?
		What makes a good leader?
		What is the signifi cance of followers?
		References
Part II Approaches to Management
	4 Managing for Results
		Planning
		Setting objectives and targets
		Organizing
		Making things happen
		References
	5 Managing Strategically
		Strategy
		Strategic management
		Developing a shared vision
		Developing strategic plans
		Strategic capability
		References
	6 Managing for Performance
		High-performance culture
		High-performance work systems
		Managing individual performance
		Managing team performance
		References
	7 Managing the Business
		On being businesslike
		Preparing a business plan
		Making a business case
		Financial budgeting and control
		Cost–benefi t analysis
		References
	8 Management Skills
		Communicating
		Report writing
		Making presentations
		Motivating
		Coaching
		Decision-making
		Delegating
		Facilitating
		Giving feedback
		Networking
		Problem-solving
		References
	9 Managing Systems and Processes
		Managing systems
		Managing processes
		Examples of systems and process management
		The confl ict and challenges of managing systems and processes
	10 Managing Health and Safety
		The importance of health and safety in the workplace
		Health and safety policies
		Conducting risk assessments
		Health and safety audits
		Health and safety inspections
		The distinction between risk assessments, audits and inspections
		Accident prevention
		Occupational health programmes
		The responsibility for health and safety
		References
	11 Self-development
		The process of self-development
		Other methods of management development
		Self-management strategies
		References
Part III Organizations
	12 Understanding Organizations
		Organizations and organizing
		How organizations function
		Organization structure
		Types of organization
		Organizational culture
		Organizational processes
		Understanding organizational policies
		References
	13 Designing Organizations
		The process of organizing
		Aim of organizational design
		Conducting organization reviews
		Organizational analysis
		Organizational diagnosis
		Job design
		References
	14 Organization Development
		Organization development defi ned
		Organization development strategies
		Assumptions and values of organization development
		Organization development activities
		References
Part IV Delivering Change
	15 The Process of Change
		Types of change
		How change happens
		Organizational dynamics – how organizations grow and change
		References
	16 Change Management
		Change models
		The steps to effective change
		How people change
		Resistance to change
		Developing and embracing a change culture
		Identifying the need for change
		The benefi ts of change
		Risks of change
		Planning the change programme
		Requirements for success in managing change
		Organizational transformation
		Holding the gains
		References
Part V Enhancing Customer Relations
	17 The Essence of 
Customer Relations
		Developing a customer-centric culture
		Customer relationship management
		Customer service
		Customer service activities
		Elements of customer satisfaction
		References
	18 Delivering High Levels of Customer Service
		Customer service strategy
		Assessing customer needs
		Identifying target customers
		Communicating to customers
		Measuring customer satisfaction
		Developing products and services to meet customer needs
		Providing the infrastructure for customer service
		Models of customer service
		Setting standards for customer service
		Monitoring the delivery of service standards
		Building satisfaction and keeping customers
		Internal customers
		Defi ning required attitudes, skills, knowledge, 
behaviours and competencies
		Developing attitudes, skills and behaviours
		World-class customer service examples
		References
Part VI Enabling Continuous Improvement
	19 Continuous Improvement
		The nature of continuous improvement
		The requirements for continuous improvement
		The conditions and behaviour that promote continuous improvement
		The framework for continuous improvement
		Approaches to continuous improvement
		Continuous improvement techniques
		Continuous improvement programmes
		Barriers to continuous improvement
		Holding the gains
		Examples of approaches to continuous improvement
		References
	20 Quality Management
		Quality defi ned
		Quality management defi ned
		Contribution of the quality gurus
		Quality management approaches
		Quality standards
		Quality management issues
		References
Appendix: Alignment of Text with Managing for Results: CIPD Professional Standards
Further Reading
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

ARMSTRONG’S
HANDBOOK

OF MANAGEMENT
AND LEADERSHIP

A guide to managing for results

2ND EDITION

Michael Armstrong

“The definitive guide on the processes of management and leadership.”

Commerce & Industry

“A revealing book that will help readers to develop leadership skills in others and guide them
towards personal excellence as a leader.”

Business Executive

“Provides a complete presentation of all that students need know to pass CIPD examinations.”

Management Services

Armstrong’s Handbook of Management and Leadership is the definitive guide to the practice of
management. It presents the key skills that will help all managers and aspiring managers to carry
out their roles effectively and achieve results. Packed with essential information on key theories
and best practice it contains many checklists, diagrams and summaries. This second edition has
been updated to reflect new thinking and ideas in this area and includes:

The book is aligned to the Managing for Results module which is part of the Chartered Institute
of Personnel and Development’s Leadership and Management Standards. The text also serves
as an ideal resource for those studying introductory management modules on business and HR
programmes.

The book is accompanied by additional online material for use by instructors as well as a set of
questions and answers to help students test their learning. To access these resources go to
www.koganpage.com/resources and under “Academic Resources” click on either “Student
Resources” or “Lecturer Resources” as applicable.

Michael Armstrong is a Companion and former Chief Examiner of the Chartered Institute of
Personnel and Development, joint managing partner of e-reward and an independent
management consultant. He has sold over 500,000 books on the subject of HRM (published with
Kogan Page).

• the practice of management – including
management roles, leadership and strategic
management;

• delivering change – the processes and
context of change;

• enhancing customer relations – approaches
to customer service and achieving high
levels of customer service;

• enabling continuous improvement –
including quality management.

Kogan Page
120 Pentonville Road
London N1 9JN
United Kingdom
www.koganpage.com

Kogan Page US
525 South 4th Street, #241
Philadelphia PA 19147
USA

9 7 8 0 7 4 9 4 5 4 1 7 3

£29.99
US $55.00

ISBN: 978-0-7494-5417-3

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Page 145

132 Organizations

Organizations and organizing

An organization is a group of people who exist to achieve a common purpose. Organizing is
the process of making arrangements in the form of defi ned or understood responsibilities and
relationships to enable those people to work cooperatively together.

Organizations may have formal structures with defi ned hierarchies (lines of command), but to
varying degrees they can operate informally as well as formally by means of a network of roles
and relationships that cut across formal organizational boundaries and lines of command.
They also function through various other processes including group behaviour, the exercise of
power, infl uence and authority and the use of politics.

How organizations function

The following schools of organization theory have evolved over the years:

The classical school – the classical or scientifi c management school, as represented by •
Fayol (1916), Taylor (1911) and Urwick (1947), believed in control, order, formality
and the need for organizations to minimize the opportunity for unfortunate and
uncontrollable informal relations, leaving room only for the formal ones.

The bureaucratic model – the bureaucratic model, as defi ned by Weber (1946), in some •
ways resembled the classical school. The features of a bureaucratic organization are
maximum specialization, clear job defi nitions, vertical authority patterns, the maximum
use of rules, and impersonal administration.

The human relations school – the classical model was challenged by Barnard (1938). •
He emphasized the importance of the informal organization – the network of informal
roles and relationships that, for better or worse, strongly infl uences the way the formal
structure operates. The importance of informal groups and decent, humane leadership
was emphasized by Elton Mayo (1933).

The behavioural science school – in the 1950s and 1960s the focus shifted to the behav- •
iour of people in organizations. Behavioural scientists such as Argyris (1957), Herzberg
(1968), McGregor (1960) and Likert (1961) adopted a humanistic point of view that
was concerned with what people can contribute and how they can best be motivated.

The systems school – Miller and Rice (1967) stated that organizations should be treated •
as open systems that are continually dependent upon and infl uenced by their environ-
ment. The basic characteristic of the enterprise as an open system is that it transforms
inputs into outputs within its environment.

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