Download 92191549 Northern Bushcraft PDF

Title92191549 Northern Bushcraft
Tags Nature Fires Energy And Resource Wood
File Size18.1 MB
Total Pages280
Table of Contents
                            (000-010)-Intro and Contents.pdf
(011-070)-Firecraft
(071-108)-Axecraft
(109-134)-Knifecraft
(135-144)-Sawcraft
(145-156)-Bindcraft
(157-190)-Sheltercraft
(191-212)-The Birches
(213-230)-The Conifers
(231-242)-The Willows
(243-250)-The Shrubs
(251-268)-The Moose
(269-280)-The Varying Hare
(282-285)-The Autor and Index
Binder2.pdf
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Document Text Contents
Page 2

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The greatest influence on my career as a student, instruc-
tor and writer about wilderness living skills and survival,
has been without question, Tom Roycraft of Hinton, whose
many years of experience and incisive insights have lent
considerable force to my bush knowledge.

Another important person is Don Bright of Edson, with
whom I published the W!derriess Arts and Recreation
magazine. The magazine motivated me to produce a work-
ing volume of written material that forms the basis for this
and future books.

I am grateful to the publisher Grant Kennedy, who pro-
vided the encouragement that resulted in this book becom-
ing available now rather than ten years from now.

Page 140

NORTHERN DUSI1CRAFT

5. Sharpening the Teeth. File a smooth bevel to the mid-
point of all jointing Hats for all the teeth for that one par-
ticular bevel, then remove the burr by dressing as described
below. The adjoining bevels are now filed so the jointing flats
arc completely removed. The bevel angle for the teeth is
about 40 degrees.
6. Dressing. Dressing removes most of the burr from the
cutting edges of the teeth. This is achieved by lightly run-
ning a fine abrasive surface back and forth on the sides of
the teeth
7. Sharpening the Rakers. The rakers are sharpened until
all the jointing flats are removed and shortened as already
described under sharpening. The rakers arc sharpened like
a chisel to a 35 degree bevel.

144

Page 141

5

BINDCRAFT

Cordage-making is an important skill in many
aspects of wilderness living. The applications
may range from sewing thread to a tow cable.
Cordage and other means of binding may be
improvised from materials readily found at
hand for shelter-making, fishing, snaring,
making weapons, packing and fire-lighting.

CORDAGE TECHNIQUES

The simplest cord or rope made by hand is two stranded.
A number of fibers make up a strand. The thicker the strand,
the thicker and stronger the cord. If the strands are twisted
in a clockwise direction at both ends, a kink will form a short
piece of cord. Fiber twisted clockwise is termed Z-twist and
counterclockwise is S-twist.

The harder the strands are twisted the steeper the twist
angle, the more strength is derived from the fibers, and the
stiffer the cord. The number of twists per unit length is
directly related to the diameter of the strands used. For a

145

Page 279

Felling,
with axe. 90. 97-98. 114
barber chair technique, 200
with knife. 119
with saw. 139

Felling Hazards. 45. 47. 49.
225-227
Firecraft. 11-70
Fire hazards. 45. 47. 49. 225-227

duff and moss. 45. 47. 49
stone rimmed fireplaces, 47

Firelay techniques, 38-45
Fire-lighting. 12-42

application. 12, 38-42
establishment. 12. 28-37
ignition. 12. 13-28
maintenance and moderation.
12, 42-70
moisture, 14. 18. 28-29. 31. 35
with twigs, 30-35
wind. 14

Fires, anatomy of. 48
distance from, 44
shelters. 41. 44. 47. 54, 215

Fire site. 45, 50
Fire woods. 42-43. 193, 227, 230.
236. 240

amount required, 43
heat value of cord, 193

Flint and steel. 12, 14-17
iron pyritc, 16
knives and. 14. 16
quartzite and. 15-16
striking the spark. 17

Frying. 67

Grass quilt, construction of, 159

Iron pyrite. uses in Hint and steel,
16

Jack Pine. 225-229

Knifecraft. 109-134
choice. 109-110
first aid. cuts. 111-113
in flint and steel. 16-17
hair cutting. 121
sharpening. 128-154

Kindlings. 13. 17. 27-30. 327
Kinnickinnick from Red Osier
Dogwood. 246

Limbing and sectioning,
axe. 102-103, 115

knife, 114-116
saw. 136. 143

Lodgepole Pine. 225-229

Matches. 12-14. 31
carrying of, 13-14

Mocock. 202. 209
Moose. 251-268

antlers. 252. 259-260
butchering. 261-264
characteristics, 251,255
habitat. 255-259
hunting. 257-261
megaphone. 207. 254
tanning hide. 264-268
tracks. 259-260

Outdoor Cooking, 12. 40, 59-70

Pine. 225-229
lire killed. 227
as fuel. 227
hazards of. 226-227
uses of. 227-229

Poplars. 231-239
as firewood. 233-234. 236
cambium. 235
conk. 232
fungus. 232-233

Amanita muscaria, 233
Armellaria mellia. 233
Pholioia squarrosoidc.s, 233
sketch pad fungi. 233

Pot suspensions. 50-58
free standing. 54
quick rigs. 51
trench lire. 53
tripod, 52
tripod pivot, 53
types.

Australian cooking crane.
55-56

Burtonsvllle rig, 56-58
High bar suspension. 56-57
elevated kitchen. 58

Pots, and (ire extinguishing, 47
Protein poisoning on hare diet.
278-279

Red Osier Dogwood. 245-246
edible berry, 246
medicinal uses. 246

Saskatoon. 245
Sallx. the true willow, 21. 239

284

Page 280

Saw craft, 135-144
tl rcssing, 144
jointing the rakers. 142
jointing the teeth. 141
sharpening, 140-144
sharpening the rakers. 144
sharpening the teeth, 144
setting the teeth. 143
uses of, 136-139

Sheltercraft. 157-190
Shelters, and fires, see also Fires,
shelters. 180. 181

bush beds. 173-176
deep open-fronted shelters. 176
enclosed shelters. 181-190
lean-to. 167-173
open-fronted shelters, 160-172
partly-enclosed open-fronted
shelters. 177-179
partially enclosed shelters.
179-184
snow shelters. 184-190, 215
teepee. 178

Shrubs. 243-250
Steaming. 47. 64-65
Steam bath, sauna. 47. 198. 230

r Strop, 132, 134, 209
Sphagnum, 215. 217. 221
Spruce, 213-224

as fuel. 31
Spruce roots, gathering and
processing. 221-224

ring, or Turkshead knot,
222-224

Spruce sap. in first aid. 216
Spruce splint baskets. 216-220,
224
Subalpinc fir. uses of. 229

Tamarack. 137. 193, 217, 224.
267

uses of. 225

Temporary utility container. 202.
204
Tinder. 16-19

false tinder fungus. 16. 19
natural tinder, 16
true tinder fungus. 16
synthetic tinder. 16

Tinder box. 14. 17. 29
Toboggan, construction, 194-195

planks. 194-195

Varying hare. 269-280
boiled. 60
broiled, 63
diseases. 277-279
population cycles. 271
robe, 276, 279-280
skinning, 275-276
snares. 274-275
uses or. 269

White Spruce, 213-216. 267
and birch bark canoes. 214.216
emergency food, 215
gum, 216
inferior glue. 216
paddles, oars. 214
resin fires. 215
stringed instruments, 214
uses of. 183

Willow. 231-242. 256
and bannock. 68
as fuel. 240
as grills, 63
and pot suspension. 54
steam mats. 65
wood. 240

Wolf, or Silver Willow. 243-244
as cordage, 153
fruit. 243
uses of, 244

285

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