Download '55 Teaching Dilemmas - Ten Powerful Solutions to Almost Any Classroom Challenge' - Paterson Kathy.doc PDF

Title'55 Teaching Dilemmas - Ten Powerful Solutions to Almost Any Classroom Challenge' - Paterson Kathy.doc
TagsTypes Articles & News Stories
File Size470.1 KB
Total Pages96
Document Text Contents
Page 1

0EMBROKEÿ0UBLISHERSÿ,IMITED

4EACHINGÿ
$ILEMMAS
4ENÿPOWERFULÿSOLUTIONSÿTOÿALMOSTÿ

ANYÿCLASSROOMÿCHALLENGE

+ATHYÿ0ATERSON

55 Teaching Dilemmas: Ten Powerful Solutions to Almost Any Classroom Challenge.Kathy Paterson. Copyright © 2005. All rights reserved. No reproduction without written permission.

Page 48

25.Opening a Lesson Well
… so that all of the students are engaged to learn

The students were silent. They sat in awe, wide eyes focused on the teacher who was
quietly and slowly digging around in a big, brown-paper shopping bag. What

would she bring out? They knew that as soon as that bag showed up, something
interesting was going to appear from it. Suddenly, out popped a miniature statue of

the Sphinx. There was a mutual gasp. “Yeah!” one student shouted with joy,
“Today we get to write about Egypt.”

Ten Ways to Open a Lesson Well

1.Begin by capturing the attention of all with a well-established cue, such as a
particular sound, maybe a whistle, bell, or piece of music, or a visual signal,

perhaps a hand raised.
2.Use “wait time.” Avoid starting until all students are attending.
3.Use the brown-bag technique by drawing from the bag surprise items

pertaining to the lesson.
4.Use a colored overhead in a darkened room. Ask students to observe it

silently for thirty seconds and to speculate about why it’s there.
5.Wear a hat that is specific to the lesson or subject. (One teacher always

wore an Italian beret when it was time for students to do art.)
6.Provide a few general clues that invite students to guess what they will be

doing. “It’s Science. We’ll look at something that has an effect on how we
come to school.” (weather)

7.Tie the lesson to students’ interests. For example: If teaching a lesson on
long division, begin by inviting students to think of anything—candies,

hamburgers, baseball cards, bracelets, movie passes—they would like to
have 100 of. Ask them to use their “choices” in such tasks as dividing the

100 items among twelve friends. Or, if the task is a writing project, provide
an umbrella theme, perhaps adventure, then allow students to choose
specific topics, such as camping or playing hockey.

8.Explain the purpose of the lesson. Students are more interested if they
know why they are doing something.

9.Explain your expectations for the lesson. At the lesson outset, tell students
exactly what they will be expected to do.

10.Use alert, confident body language and demonstrate passion for what you
are about to teach or share.

48 Teaching Strategies

55 Teaching Dilemmas: Ten Powerful Solutions to Almost Any Classroom Challenge.Kathy Paterson. Copyright © 2005. All rights reserved. No reproduction without written permission.

Have you ever thought that you
spend more time “getting ready to
teach” than teaching?

Page 49

26.Closing a Lesson with Impact
… instead of just “working till the bell”

The teacher was watching her Grade 6 students leave at the end of the day when
she heard James ask Billy, “Did we have Social Studies homework?”

Billy replied, “Did we even have Social Studies today?”
The teacher sighed. So much for what she thought was a powerful lesson about

governments leaving an impact.

Ten Ways to Close a Lesson with Impact

1.Watch the time and leave two or three minutes for closure.
2.Insist that students spend a few seconds in silent reflection to encourage

information retention.
3.Ask students to jot down what they learned in their journals.
4.Provide an oral summary of the lesson. (See STOP below.)
5. Invite students to do the summary orally. (Tell me what we talked about …

Summarize for me …)
6.Call for a silent response from every student. (Close your eyes and

summarize in your head.)
7.Link the closing to your opening activity. (We started today by … and we

learned that …)
8.Note the relevance of the lesson. (We just learned that … because … This …

will help us when …)
9. Invite students to pair up and share what they just learned.

10.If time has truly run out, then at the least quickly say what you have just
done.

S “WeStarted the lesson ...”

T “TheTopic (Theme) was ...”

O “OurOpportunities for practice were ...”

P “ThePurpose of learning this is ...”

Teaching Strategies49

55 Teaching Dilemmas: Ten Powerful Solutions to Almost Any Classroom Challenge.Kathy Paterson. Copyright © 2005. All rights reserved. No reproduction without written permission.

How often have you been in the
middle of a sentence when the bell
sounds and students start packing
up and rushing off?

Similer Documents