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Exploring Kodály: Philosophies, Materials, & Pedagogy

Dr. Pattye Casarow, Clearwater Christian College


Exploring Kodály: Philosophies, Materials, & Pedagogy


Dr. Pattye Casarow, Clearwater Christian College







I. Philosophies


A. Everyone has the right to music literacy and it is meant to be enjoyed!

B. Singing can and should provide the foundation for all types of music.


C. Music education should begin at the earliest possible age.


D. A child’s own culture provides his/her musical “mother tongue.” Folk music is the “musical

mother tongue” of the child. Folk songs provide ideal materials for music education.


E. Only music that clearly demonstrates artistic merit (folk or composed) should be used in
teaching.


F. Only the finest musicians should teach music. The lessons should be child-centered with a
discovery approach. The goal is music literacy. The teacher creates a stimulating, joyful, and
invigorating atmosphere in the classroom. This is the essence of Kodály. The teacher makes
the difference.





“The singing of folksongs must form a part of every music lesson; not only to provide practice in them for their
own sake, but to maintain continuity and also to awaken, develop, and maintain the sense of the relationship

between music and the language. For there is no denying that it is here, in folk song, that the most perfect
relationship between music and language can be found.”

Zoltán Kodály.

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Exploring Kodály: Philosophies, Materials, & Pedagogy

Dr. Pattye Casarow, Clearwater Christian College

I eat my peas with honey,

I’ve done it all my life.

They do taste kind of funny,

But it keeps them on my knife.





Handy Spandy, Jack-a-dandy,

Loved plum cake and sugar candy;

He bought some at a grocer’s shop,

And out he came, hop, hop, hop.





Cinderella, dressed in yella.

Went upstairs to kiss a fella.

Made a mistake and kissed a snake.

How many doctors did it take?

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, …





If all the world was apple pie,

And all the sea was ink,

And all the trees were bread and cheese,

What could we do for drink?





A diller, a dollar,

A ten o’clock scholar,

What makes you come so soon?

You used to come at ten o’clock,

And now you come at noon.





Jack and Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water.

Jack fell down and broke his crown.

And Jill came tumbling after.





Jack Sprat could eat no fat;

His wife could eat no lean.

And between the both of them

They licked the platter clean.





Crooked heels and scuffy toes

Are all the kinds of shoes he knows.

He patches up the broken places.

Sews the seams and shines their faces.

Flying Man, Flying Man up in the sky.

Where are you going to, flying so high?

Over the mountains and over the sea –

Flying Man, Flying Man, can’t you take me?





Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep

And can’t tell where to find them.

Leave them alone and they’ll come home,

Wagging their tails behind them.


Jerry Hall

He is so small;

A rat could eat him,

Hat and all.





There was a young farmer of Leeds

Who swallowed six packets of seeds.

It soon came to pass

He was covered with grass

And he couldn’t sit down for the weeds.



A peanut sat on the railroad track

His heart was all a-flutter.

Along came a train, the 9:15

Toot, toot! Peanut butter!

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Exploring Kodály: Philosophies, Materials, & Pedagogy

Dr. Pattye Casarow, Clearwater Christian College

BIBLIOGRAPHY



Amidon, Peter and Mary Alice. Chimes of Dunkirk, Down in the Valley, Jump Jim Joe, Listen to the Mocking

Bird, Sashay the Donut. Brattleboro, VT: New England Dancing Masters Productions, 1991.



Bradford, Louise L. Sing It Yourself: 220 Pentatonic American Folk Songs. Van Nuys, CA: Alfred

Publishing Co., 1978.



Choksy, Lois. The Kodály Context: Creating an Environment for Musical Learning. Saddle River, NJ:

Prentice Hall, Inc., 1981.



________. The Kodály Method I: Comprehensive Music Education, 3
rd

edition. Saddle River, NJ: Prentice

Hall, Inc., 1999.



Choksy, Lois and David Brummitt. 120 Singing Games and Dances for Elementary Schools. Englewood

Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1987.



East, Helen. The Singing Sack: Twenty-Eight Song-Stories from around the World. London: A & C Black,

1989.



Feierabend, John. Move It! Expressive Movements to Classical Music (DVD and CD). Chicago, IL: GIA

Publications, 2003.



Solomon, Jim. The Body Rondo book: 12 Body Percussion Rondos, Elementary to Advanced. Lakeland, TN:

Memphis Musicraft Publications, 1997.



Trinka, Jill. Bought Me a Cat and Other Folk Songs, Singing Games, and Play Parties. Dripping Springs, TX: Jill
Trinka, Ph. D., 1987.

________. John, the Rabbit and Other Folk Songs, Singing Games, and Play Parties. Dripping Springs, TX: Jill
Trinka, Ph. D., 1988.

________. My Little Rooster and Other Folk Songs, Singing Games, and Play Parties. Dripping Springs, TX: Jill
Trinka, Ph. D., 1989.


________. The Little Black Bull and Other Folk Songs, Singing Games, and Play Parties. Dripping Springs,

TX: Jill Trinka, Ph. D., 1996.



Weikart, Phyllis S. Teaching Movement and Dance: A Sequential Approach to Rhythmic Movement. Ypsilanti,

MI: High/Scope Press, 2006.



________. Rhythmically Moving. (9 CD’s)



Weikart, Phyllis S. and Elizabeth B. Carlton. Eighty-Five Engaging Movement Activities. Ypsilanti, MI:

High/Scope Press, 2002.

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